Adventures in the Forgotten Realms Limited Ratings

The AetherHub Limited Ratings are divided into two categories; The AI ratings gathered with data from the MTGA Assistant deck tracker and Pro ratings provided by Nizzahon Magic. The key difference is that the Pro ratings and comments are made before the set officially releases while the AI ratings are dynamically updated with new data all the time. This means that you should use the Pro ratings as guidance early on when new sets releases and the AI Ratings after a week or two after release. Here is an explanation of how we score the cards:

  • 5.0 The absolute best you can get.
  • 4.5 Incredible bomb, but not unbeatable.
  • 4.0 Good rare or top-tier uncommon.
  • 3.5 Top-tier common or solid uncommon.
  • 3.0 Good playable that always make the cut.
  • 2.5 A solid playable that rarely gets cut.
  • 2.0 A good playable, but is sometimes cut.
  • 1.5 Filler card but sometimes gets cut.
  • 1.0 Not good filler and often gets gut.
  • 0.5 Almost Unplayable and mostly sideboard material.
  • 0.0 Not playable at all.
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+2 Mace

AI Rating: 1.5
Pro Rating: 2.0

This gives an alright boost for the mana it costs to play and equip, but it isn’t crazy efficient or anything, and it will probably be cut a decent chunk of the time.

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Arborea Pegasus

AI Rating: 2
Pro Rating: 3.0

This is a pretty good Common. The ETB trigger will almost always enable an attack you didn’t have before, and that means that the Pegasus will have an immediate impact on the board, in addition to being a 4-mana 2/3 Flyer itself.

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Blink Dog

AI Rating: 1.1
Pro Rating: 1.0

This doesn’t look very good. 3 mana for a 1/1 with Double Strike is rough, and the Phase effect is cool, but also costly. I guess if you have some Equipment he can get interesting, but I think you mostly won’t play this

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The Book of Exalted Deeds

AI Rating: 4.5
Pro Rating: 0.5 // 3.5

This is a pretty serious build around. This Book does have the bonus of overlapping with the GW archetype, but it still seems like you have do to a ton of work for this thing to do anything. You really need to be making Angels with it or it will be a complete dud. The mana cost is actually pretty challenging too in your typical Limited deck, and you really want to get this down before you start gaining life, but doing that will not be easy. There are very few ways to gain 3 or more life with a single card in this format, so to get the Angels, you’ll have to string multiple life gain effects together in most cases.

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Celestial Unicorn

AI Rating: 2
Pro Rating: 3.0

GW is the color pair most interested in gaining life in this format, and this is a very nice Common payoff for that kind of deck. And, it can be pretty solid in other decks too, as it isn’t like GW is the only deck where you’ll be able to gain life. This can get big fast, and has a reasonable starting point as a 3-mana 3/2. It seems like a pretty good Common.

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Cleric Class

AI Rating: 2.9
Pro Rating: 1.5 // 3.5

GW is about gaining life, and this will fit in really well there. Like with most of these, the level 1 Enchantment probably wouldn’t be worth playing, but I think the next two abilities on this one are quite potent. Level 2 gives you an Ajani’s Pridemate effect, which is great if you have some life gain, and Level 3 lets you reanimate a creature and gain some life, which will also mean you put a counter somewhere. The total package here is pretty appealing, but probably still a pretty serious build around. It has a kind of reasonable floor as most decks can take advantage of the reanimation, but it is probably not going to be very good in your typical White deck, and like a B in a GW deck that is good at gaining life

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Cloister Gargoyle

AI Rating: 3.2
Pro Rating: 3.0

A 3-mana 0/4 that ventures into the dungeon is probably already a decent card for the format, but this looks to be one of the bigger payoffs for completing dungeons at lower rarities, as it becoming a ¾ Flyer is a pretty big deal -- that kind of size almost always matters on an evasive creature, and it is going to give you value when it ETBs no matter what.

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Dancing Sword

AI Rating: 4.7
Pro Rating: 4.0

So, if this were just 1W for an Equipment that Equipped for one and gave +2/+1, I would already be on board. That’s a great boost for the cost. Obviously, the added bonus that it can become a 2/1 Flyer when that’s something you need more is pretty nice. A +2/+1 boost can eventually get outclassed, especially if you don’t have Evasive creature, so, the sword’s ability to just turn into one will definitely come up, though I think a lot of the time, you might prefer to keep it as an Equipment. Either way, this is a very good card worth a pretty high pick.

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Dawnbringer Cleric

AI Rating: 1.8
Pro Rating: 2.5

None of these effects are amazing, but the flexibility this card offers is quite nice. Mostly, you’ll gain 2 life with it, which will be okayish -- but when you have an Enchantment to destroy or a key card to remove from your opponent’s graveyard, it will feel especially good. Gaining life also matters some in this set, so there’s some synergy to be had. I think this is a solid playable.

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Delver's Torch

AI Rating: 1.8
Pro Rating: 2.0

The cost of playing this and Equipping it is pretty high for only a +1/+1 stat boost. Venturing every time the creature attacks is where the real value is, but as high as I am on Venture, I’m not a huge fan of this card. It doesn’t do a whole lot to help one of your creatures attack that couldn’t already attack before, and I think that’s the big thing you want Equipment to do for you, and +1/+1 isn’t going to do it that often, which won’t feel great for such a high Equip cost. If you already have Evasive creatures or a big creature it could be nice because you can get the Venture going, but yeah, I think this is clunky and overwhelming overall

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Devoted Paladin

AI Rating: 1.7
Pro Rating: 3.5

Pumping your whole board and giving it Vigilance almost always seems to allow for some serious attacking on your part. After all, your creatures are bigger, and you’re going to be able to leave them all back as blockers even if you’re going to attack with them! We’ve seen similar cards like Dawnfeather Eagle end up great in Limited, and this format does look like it has the means to go wide effectively, and if that’s true, the Paladin is going to be one of the cards you want the most to round out your top curve.

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Divine Smite

AI Rating: 1.3
Pro Rating: 2.5

Phasing something out just isn’t that good. It is sort of like bouncing a creature, except it is worse in the sense that your opponent doesn’t have to pay mana again to get their creature back. It will just come back on its own. In that sense, it is more like tapping a creature down for one turn. You also can’t use it on your own creature to save it from removal or something like that, you can only target the opponent’s stuff. Still, it does a kind of reasonable thing against all creatures or planeswalkers, and will be insane against people playing Black. I think that if this was just the phasing side of it, it wouldn’t be very good. So, this one might be better to start in your sideboard, which I don’t think is true of the rest of this cycle. Still, you’ll run into people playing Black often enough that I think this is a solid playable.

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Dragon's Disciple

AI Rating: 1.3
Pro Rating: 2.0

This is a nice Dragon payoff, as being able to play this as a two-mana 2/4 will feel pretty great, especially on turn 2! Adding Ward 1 to all your dragons isn’t too shabby either. The fact that this has a fail case of being a two mana ⅓ gives it a not entirely terrible floor too. There are enough Dragons around in this set for you to be able to take full advantage of this a decent chunk of the time. You probably need like 3 in your deck to feel good about it, but when you get there, this will be a nice card for you.

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Dwarfhold Champion

AI Rating: 2
Pro Rating: 2.5

A two mana 3/1 tends to be a reasonable baseline for aggro decks, and this comes with some decent additional upside. Gaining toughness when you equip it will feel pretty nice, as obviously a 3/1 is pretty vulnerable

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Flumph

AI Rating: 1.5
Pro Rating: 2.0

This has a strange design, but I think overall it seems fine.. Symmetrical card draw kind of just leaves you and your opponent at parity, and in the mean time this can block a whole lot of stuff.

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Gloom Stalker

AI Rating: 0.9
Pro Rating: 2.5

This is pretty bad if you haven’t completed a dungeon, and if you have, it is pretty good, but still not incredible.

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Grand Master of Flowers

AI Rating: 5
Pro Rating: 4.0

This is not the kind of planeswalker that will take over the game with ease, but it still seems pretty good. His first +1 is where you’ll get the most bang for your buck, as making creatures unable to attack or block can have a pretty big impact on the game, and can allow the Grand Master to protect itself. Now, he can’t stop creatures with some pretty common key-word ability, but that’s okay – he can still stop most stuff. His other +1 is only going to be useful if you have also drafted Monk of the Open Hand. We’ll see the monk later in this video. It is an Uncommon, and a pretty nice one drop, but you aren’t really guaranteed to get one in your draft, so that effect might be useless. If you can get a monk or two, though, that other +1 will feel good while you can use it, as you get a body to protect the Grand Master. Obviously the big goal here is to get the Grand Master up to 7 loyalty, at which point he becomes a huge indestructible Dragon, but making that happen won’t be easy. It will take 4 turns to get there, and while he can protect himself to some extent, he’s not so good at it that it will be easy to make that happen. Now, your opponent will want to commit significant resources to keeping his loyalty from getting that high, and that will also give you some value. All in all though, I don’t think this is a bomb planeswalker – merely a good one.

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Guardian of Faith

AI Rating: 4.7
Pro Rating: 4.0

They have really been trying their hardest to stick Phasing on cards lately, and this one seems pretty good! Keep in mind, Phasing is not the same as a flicker or blink effect, in the sense that your creature stays on the battlefield, it is just treated as if it didn’t exist, and that means it can’t be targeted or damaged, but also that it can’t block or attack. Those creatures will come back and be normal on your next upkeep, though. Anyway, with that explanation out of the way, how good is this going to be in Limited? I think...probably pretty good. At worst, you have a 3-mana 3/2 with Flash, which is something that would probably make the cut more often than not, and the ETB Phasing ability can be used in a variety of effective ways. You can use it to save a creature from removal, or set up a block that would have been a chump, and then flash this in to keep the creature around. There won’t always be situations where you can actually do something with this, as sometimes the board just won’t be where it needs to be, but because it has a reasonable fail-case and a reasonably high ceiling, I think you can value this relatively highly.

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Half-Elf Monk

AI Rating: 1.1
Pro Rating: 3.0

Mastery Decoy effects still tend to be pretty good in Limited. Tapping down your opponent’s best creature every turn often just feels like removal, and this has the minor added bonus of being able to attack and still use the ability. I say “minor” because it is only a ¼, so that’s not exactly incredible. Still, this is a pretty nice common for White.

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Icingdeath, Frost Tyrant

AI Rating: 5
Pro Rating: 5.0

This is a stone cold bomb. It starts out life as a really problematic creature for your opponent - a 4-mana 4/3 with Flying and Vigilance will rapidly kill your opponent if they don’t do something, but what really pushes this into bomb range is that even if they can do something, you end up with a pretty good Equipment anyway -- the stats boost AND the ability to tap down blockers will put your opponent in a ton of trouble, and it is the kind of boost that makes any creature a threat

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Ingenious Smith

AI Rating: 2.9
Pro Rating: 3.0

This set has a decent number of Artifacts in it., so the ETB ability will probably draw you a card like half the time in a typical White deck. The other part of the card, However, does count Treasure, and while Treasure is more concentrated in other colors than White, it is all over the set, so it growing from Treasure is a very real possibility.

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Keen-Eared Sentry

AI Rating: 1.5
Pro Rating: 1.5

This doesn’t seem that good to me. Giving yourself hexproof won’t matter very often, and neither will limiting your opponent to only one venture a turn. Maybe this is here to help provide some Dungeon hate for constructed, where venturing more than once a turn will happen all the time, but in Limited, it isn’t going to happen so often that you desperately want this little two drop. It does have an okay baseline, so it isn’t terrible, but its text box won’t matter that much.

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Loyal Warhound

AI Rating: 4.7
Pro Rating: 3.0

A two mana 3/1 with vigilance is a nice baseline, and the fact that this will also ramp for you sometimes is awesome. If you’re on the draw, it won’t really be hard to get that part of the card to trigger, and if you are missing land drops and stuff this guy can really save the day.

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Minimus Containment

AI Rating: 3.4
Pro Rating: 4.0

This is a pretty neat take on White’s usually Enchantment-based removal spell. So, the idea is that you use this on an opposing permanent that is a problem, but the downside is you give your opponent a treasure. The good news about that is that by the late game, the downside will become increasingly negligible, and even in the mid-game, this will often just be worth doing. Not sure I would really recommend using this on a really early creature, though. It will probably be a net-gain for you overall, but the mana you give your opponent early can really come back to bite you. This is still premium removal though, especially since it deals with all nonlands. In a pinch, you can also put it on your own permanent if you really need a specific color of mana or something, but that’s almost never going to be the right thing to do.

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Monk of the Open Hand

AI Rating: 2.1
Pro Rating: 2.5

This card reminds me a lot of the BW double-spell deck from Kaldheim. If you can get your curve low enough, this guy can grow relatively quickly and without you having to commit significant resources. It does look like a low-curve aggro deck is a thing in this format too, especially in RW, so I can see this being a nice fit there. This is also the Monk that the Planeswalker we saw earlier -- Grand Master of Flowers can tutor up, so it should go up in your pick order if you have the Grand Master. It takes some work to make the Monk worth playing if you don’t have the Grand Master, but if you find yourself with a low curve, this will be a nice fit.

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Moon-Blessed Cleric

AI Rating: 2.6
Pro Rating: 3.0

This does a pretty good Heliod’s Pilgrim impression. It can’t tutor the card right to your hand, but it lets you get any kind of Enchantment, not an Aura, and it also comes with better stats for the cost, so I think it will end up playing very similarly to the Pilgrim, who tends to be a pretty nice card to have in most limited formats. Obviously you need some Enchantments to really get it going, but that doesn’t seem like a difficult hurdle.

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Nadaar, Selfless Paladin

AI Rating: 4.9
Pro Rating: 4.5

A 3-mana 3/3 with Vigilance is a great place to start, and doing dungeon stuff every time he ETBs OR Attacks is incredibly good, and that would be true even if he didn’t also give you a massive bonus for completing the dungeon! Between Nadaar and other dungeon cards, it isn’t super far-fetched you get the anthem effect too. Especially because one of the dungeons needs only 4 ventures to be completed, and Nadaar can do half of that on his own between his ETB ability and his first attack. I think Nadaar does enough to get into the lower bomb range.

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Oswald Fiddlebender

AI Rating: 3.3
Pro Rating: 2.0

So, these types of abilities are tough to make work in Limited. They can shine in constructed because you can make your deck so that it can really effectively utilize it, but in Limited, you’ll be dependent on the draft going just the right way for the ability to always be useful, and even then it might not be worth it! The good news is, it has a baseline as a two mana 2/2, and even if you just end up with a 2-mana and 3-mana Artifact in your deck, the ability might actually come up sometimes. This seems like it will get cut a lot, as just a straight up bear isn’t what it used to be, but it does have a decent enough fail case.

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Paladin Class

AI Rating: 4.8
Pro Rating: 4.5

This is one of the best Class Enchantments. The base of the card isn’t especially good, but once you get up to the second level, you’ve paid 4 mana for an Anthem and a tax on your opponent’s spells during your turn, and I think that would probably be a card I always played, and this has the upside of letting you pay that 4 mana in installments, as well as the fact that it can go to level three, at which point it will make one of your creatures into a really frightening attacker every turn.

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Paladin's Shield

AI Rating: 0.6
Pro Rating: 1.0

We have seen Equipment like this before, and I’ve never really been impressed by it. A boost to toughness alone is very rarely something you’re after in your Equipment, and while this does have Flash, so you can use it as sort of a combat trick, it will usually only ever save your creature, and not really help it win combat. Then, after you get to attach it for free that one time, the Equip cost is really high for what this is. RW decks do have an Equipment sub-theme, and that helps it out a little bit, but not enough for it to be something you play regularly.

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Planar Ally

AI Rating: 3
Pro Rating: 3.5

We have seen a lot of 5-mana 3/3 Flyers of late that have some ability, and they’ve all been pretty nice cards for Limited, and I think that’s what we have here. Venturing with every attack is great, as the Ally, left unchecked, will be able to get you through dungeons all on its own. This format does have more large flyers than usual as a result of the heavy Dragon theme, so this may find itself unable to attack effectively more than it would in most formats, but I think this is still a pretty good Common.

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Plate Armor

AI Rating: 3.8
Pro Rating: 3.0

This is some pretty solid Equipment. 3 to play and 3 to equip can be a little costly, but the good news is that whatever you put this on is going to become a problem, as +3/+3 is enough to make virtually any creature a lot scarier. Ward 1 is nice too, as it makes the amount of mana you spend on this hurt a little less when they kill your creature. Sometimes you’ll be able to Equip it for less, especially in RW which really likes Equipment.

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Portable Hole

AI Rating: 2.8
Pro Rating: 2.0

This will feel pretty good to use on a two-drop permanent, as you will come out ahead mana wise and it will prevents death triggers and stuff like that. It can also deal with all of the Class Enchantments, which will certainly come up. However, just being able to hit two and one mana permanents is a liability in Limited. This isn’t something that will even always make the cut. It could end up being better if aggro decks are a big deal in this format.

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Potion of Healing

AI Rating: 0.6
Pro Rating: 1.5

Most of the time we see this kind of effect on a spell and it costs one fewer total mana than Potion of Healing does to draw you a card and gain you some life. This lets you pay it in installments though, and it is nice that you can just play it to draw the card and hold on to the life gain for a little bit later, especially if you’re in GW and you have some things that this can trigger for you. Still, this card seems pretty replacable, just like Revitalize and similar cards we’ve seen. You’ll probably cut it more than you play it.

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Priest of Ancient Lore

AI Rating: 3.5
Pro Rating: 3.5

This is a pretty great Common. People are always complaining white doesn’t have enough card draw, so getting an ETB ability like this will make them happy. In Limited, this will be a 2-for-1 a lot of the time, and the fact it gains that 1 life is no small thing either, since GW is all about gaining life.

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Rally Maneuver

AI Rating: 2.4
Pro Rating: 2.0

This is an interesting trick. You typically want to only be spending 1-2 mana on tricks, but when they start being able to target multiple creatures, I get interested in more expensive ones too, since they at least have the possibility of creating a 2-for-1. This would obviously be better if it just gave +2/+0 and First Strike to two thing, but there will be situations where this lines up pretty nicely, allowing two of your creatures to win combat while gaining you some life. It is sort of unfortunate that it requires you to target two separate creatures, but this still seems pretty solid as far as tricks go. The first copy seems like it will be pretty good in White aggressive decks.

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Ranger's Hawk

AI Rating: 1.6
Pro Rating: 2.0

One mana 1/1 flyers are almost never that great in Limited unless they have something else worthwhile going on. The good news for this Hawk, is that it does! In the early game it can attack a bit in the air, but it will quickly be forced to stop attacking. Luckily, it has a late game mana sink that seems pretty good -- venturing into dungeons every turn will definitely allow you to grind out some wins late. Now, the cost of doing it isn’t small -- having to have another untapped creature isn’t a guarantee, but if you are at parity or ahead of your opponent, it won’t be that hard to make it happen. I think this is a solid playable.

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Steadfast Paladin

AI Rating: 3.2
Pro Rating: 3.0

Two mana 2/2s with Lifelink tend to be solid enough in Limited, especially in a format with a life gain archetype. It will also wield Equipment pretty effectively.

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Teleportation Circle

AI Rating: 4.3
Pro Rating: 1.0 // 3.5

This looks like a build around. This kind of effect just doesn’t matter if you don’t have the right deck for it. Just kidding “pseudo-Vigilance” out of it isn’t worth it. The good news is that both BW and UW look like they are in a reasonably good position to make use of this, and when you can get some kind of ETB trigger every turn out of this, it will feel great -- especially if it involves Venturing into Dungeons! But still, I don’t think your average deck in the format will be able to put this to use.

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Veteran Dungeoneer

AI Rating: 2.5
Pro Rating: 3.5

This seems like a pretty darn good Common. As I’ve said throughout the video, Venturing isn’t quite drawing a card most of the time, but it gives you value that isn’t that far away from drawing a card, and if this was a 4-mana ¾ that drew you a card, it would be amazing. And again, this won’t quite feel like a 2-for-1 all the time, but it does do a lot for the mana cost, and enough to be one of White’s best Commons.

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White Dragon

AI Rating: 3.9
Pro Rating: 4.0

Adding a creature to the battlefield while also hampering your opponent’s side of the table for a full turn cycle is pretty serious, especially when that creature is a 4/4 Flyer! This will just give you all kinds of tempo, and can really swing the game in your favor, which is a great thing for an Uncommon to be capable of. I think this might be the best card in the uncommon dragon cycle.

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You Hear Something on Watch

AI Rating: 2.6
Pro Rating: 3.0

This seems like a pretty nice Common. Sure, the removal effect only works on attackers, so if you’re the beat down it won’t feel great -- but the good news is if you are the beat down, you’re probably interested in the other mode, since it pays you off pretty well for going wide. The removal is too situational to be premium, but it will kill lots of attackers, and having the board pump effect as an option is pretty nice.

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You're Ambushed on the Road

AI Rating: 0.4
Pro Rating: 1.5

LIke most of this cycle, this card takes two options that would not be a great card on their own and puts them together, and the product is definitely greater than the sum of its parts. White-Blue especially is interested in bouncing its own creatures to retrigger ETB abilities, so that part of the card will come up in ways other than just to save a creature from removal. The trick part is mediocre, but will find its place. Each card individually would be a 1.0 at best, but together, I think the options make this card a pretty decent playable.

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Aberrant Mind Sorcerer

AI Rating: 2.4
Pro Rating: 3.5

10-20 is the preferable option, and you have a slightly higher chance of getting that, and 1-9 isn’t too shabby either, as returning a removal spell to the top of your library is some powerful card selection. If you always got the 10-20 effect, it would be a 4.0, and if you always get 1-9, it would probably be a 3.0, so let’s split the difference at 3.5.

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Air-Cult Elemental

AI Rating: 1.5
Pro Rating: 3.0

This is one big Man-O’-War! A 6-mana 2/5 Flyer is a bad rate, but because this bounces another creature, you’ll often feel like you’re getting your mana’s worth. If you know me, you know I always love this kind of effect – and there’s a reason for that, it is great in Limited! Adding to your board while subtracting from your opponent’s is one of the best feelings you can have! And yeah, while the 2/5 stats aren’t exactly incredible, it is enough that the elemental can still be a little bit of a threat in the sky, or be an effective blocker. It does cost 6 mana, so you don’t really want more than one of them, but I think I’m going to value the first copy relatively highly.

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Arcane Investigator

AI Rating: 1.3
Pro Rating: 2.0

A two mana 2/1 isn’t great these days, but this one does come with a pretty nice late game effect. No matter what you roll, being able to draw cards late is pretty nice. Still, for the bluk of the game, the Investigator is just not very good. It will be outclasses quickly in the early game, and in the mid-game it will be even more useless.

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Bar the Gate

AI Rating: 1.5
Pro Rating: 3.0

This seems like a pretty good counterspell. They always come with big downsides, like how situational they are, and three mana for one is normally not a card you really want to play, but when some additional value is added on to countermagic, it becomes increasingly worth it, and that’s what we have here. Sure, it doesn’t counter everything -- but creatures are the most common thing your opponent will do, so it will often have targets. Venturing into the Dungeon isn’t quite “draw a card” most of the time, but it gets close enough that I’m actually pretty interested in the first copy of this for most Blue decks.

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The Blackstaff of Waterdeep

AI Rating: 2.3
Pro Rating: 1.5

This is an odd card, but my initial impression of it is that it isn’t that impressive. This set does have a decent number of Artifacts, including Treasure – but it doesn’t actually let you animate treasure, because they are tokens. That leave you with only the regular artifacts in the set, and while there are a significant number, I’m not sure there are going to be enough in your typical Blue deck to just have this work, since it is a completely useless card without other Artifacts. And really, to take full advantage, you will want a lot of artifacts, because you just want to be able to send in the 4/4 until your opponent kills it. If you can do that again after the first one goes down, this will sort of feel like a 2-for-1, because it may not do anything else the rest of the game.

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Blue Dragon

AI Rating: 3.1
Pro Rating: 3.5

That’s a pretty wacky ETB ability, but it is one that seems pretty nice. It weakens all of those creatures until your next turn, so you can take advantage of their lower power so that you can attack on your turn, and then also benefit from the fact that your creatures can’t attack as hard. This does cost 7, but it also impacts the board in an immediate way and gives you a relatively imposing flyer. Still, there will be times when the ability doesn’t do much either way, and I think that probably keeps it from getting into “first pickable” range.

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Charmed Sleep

AI Rating: 3
Pro Rating: 3.5

I’m always hesitant to give Blue removal a “premium removal” grade, because it seems more often than not they don’t get there due to various disadvantages, but I think this gets there just barely. It did last time we saw it too. It doesn’t shut down static or activated abilities, but most creatures will become useless once this is on it.

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Clever Conjurer

AI Rating: 1.1
Pro Rating: 2.5

This ability only being Sorcery speed is a bummer, but it is still a pretty useful one to have on a 3-mana ⅔. Notably, it can untap lands for you, helping you ramp. And that’s probably the way you’ll use it the most. This seems like a solid playable.

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Contact Other Plane

AI Rating: 1.9
Pro Rating: 3.0

So, with a 1-9 you’re getting an Instant speed Divination that costs one extra, which isn’t great, that would probably be a 1.5 or 2.0, but isn’t the worst fail case when the 10-19 gives you a pretty great effect for the cost -- like Behold the Multiverse without Foretell, and that’s a good place to be. Obviously, rolling the 20 will be completely absurd. If that’s what this card always did, it would be like a 4.0. We have to sort of think about what’s the most likely with this, and I think the fail case is passable enough that I’m pretty happy with this over all, as 10-19 is a pretty likely outcome, and that card would probably be a B-. In the end, I think all of that makes this a 3.0.

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Demilich

AI Rating: 4.2
Pro Rating: 1.5 // 4.0

This guy looks primed to be insane in multiple constructed formats, but I don’t think it will be that good in Limited. . You can’t really count on casting a bunch of spells in a turn to make the casting cost more manageable. Unless you’re mono-blue, you’ll probably need to cast at least two spells ahead of this to be able to cast it reliably. Obviously, the attack trigger is nice, but it also requires you to have some mana to actually cast the spell that you copy since it says “Cast it,” so you don’t just stick the spell on the stack like effects that just say “Copy target spell.” Now, casting that spell is pretty nice, as it is effectively an extra card in your hand, and a 4/3 will often at least trade in combat, so you get a 2-for-1. And lastly, the ability to come back from the graveyard is also going to be pretty rough. So overall, unless you’re Mono-Blue – and a super spell heavy Mono-Blue -, you probably won’t be able to play this card, and I wouldn’t recommend going hardcore mono-Blue just for one copy of this. You just won’t be casting 4 spells in a turn and playing this for Free in Limited, and you’ll be lucky to get it down to UU even. So, in the end, I guess this deserves a build around grade, because it is obviously insanely powerful in a deck that gets there on spells.

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Displacer Beast

AI Rating: 3.3
Pro Rating: 4.0

This seems quite good for an Uncommon. It has sort of passable stats, especially because it does a whole lot more than just sit around as a 3-mana 3/2! The ETB trigger will be quite nice, as Venturing will give you some very significant value. It isn’t quite Professor of Symbology, but I think the comparison helps illustrate why this card will be good. The fact it can bounce itself back to your hand won’t always come up, but in the late game, it can help you venture through a dungeon all on its own, and that will often be a pretty big deal.

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Djinni Windseer

AI Rating: 3
Pro Rating: 3.5

I was already pretty sold on a 4-mana 3/3 Flyer, so adding the d20 effect is just gravy. Even just Scrying 1 with this will feel like you’re getting nice value, and sometimes it will do more than that. The set also has some d20 payoffs, especially in UR, making it marginally better than that. It isn’t the most exciting card, but it is a pretty darn good Common.

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Dragon Turtle

AI Rating: 4.4
Pro Rating: 4.0

This has a pretty neat design. You get a super efficient creature who can lock down an opposing creature for a turn, though it does have to tap itself down too. One thing to keep in mind though, if you play this on your opponent’s turn, it will mean that your Dragon Turtle untapped before their creature does, since your “next turn” will be more immediate, and that means that Dragon Turtle will get to take advantage of the thing being tapped down for one attack. Either way, this will be a good way to slow down the opponent’s board while also adding to your own, even if the creature can’t immediately get in there for damage. This seems like a high-quality card to me, one you’ll first pick a lot.

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Eccentric Apprentice

AI Rating: 3.7
Pro Rating: 4.0

This is another really strong Uncommon for Blue. It starts out as a Wind Drake, and has an ETB venture effect, I think I would pretty much always be playing that card. But then, once you complete a dungeon, it has quite the powerful effect. Turning another creature into a 1/1 Flyer can either help you chip in for more damage, or severely waken an opposing creature. There really seems to be plenty of Venturing in this set, so completing dungeons isn’t going to be crazy far-fetched. You shouldn’t quite count on it just being the case, but the Apprentice will probably be fully upgraded like 20% of the time, and that’s awesome. This is a high pick, and likely one of the best Uncommons in the set.

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Feywild Trickster

AI Rating: 3.3
Pro Rating: 1.0 // 3.5

How good this card is will be super dependent on the rest of your deck, since a Gray Ogre is just a horrible stat-line these days. The good news is, as long as you get one token out of this you’re probably doing alright, and more than that will be incredibly powerful. Still, while d20s are around in this set, you probably need 5+ cards that involve them for this to do its thing, and for that reason I think I need to give this a build around grade.

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Fly

AI Rating: 3
Pro Rating: 2.5

So, when we see an Aura that grants Flying to a creature and draws you a card, it tends to be reasonably playable. While Venturing into a dungeon a single time won’t quite be as good as drawing a card, most of the time if you do it twice, it will feel like a whole card’s worth of value, and that will make up for the risk of getting 2-for-1’d when your opponent kills what this is attached to. Now, your creature does have to hit your opponent to get the effect, and that isn’t guaranteed or anything, but it seems like on a lot of boards, giving a creature these abilities will make it a big problem for your opponent.

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Grazilaxx, Illithid Scholar

AI Rating: 4.8
Pro Rating: 4.0

This card has a really neat design. So, if any of your creatures are blocked, instead of combat damage actually happening, this can let you return that creature to your hand. Sometimes it won’t be worth doing, but the great thing here is that it is a “may” ability. So, any combat your creature can win, you just let happen -- if your creature will die in combat, you just return it to your hand. This can be especially spicy with ETB abilities, but also just allows for pretty much free attacks. In addition to all that this has the always-power combat damage to a player trigger that draws you a card, so your opponent will be incentivized to block for sure. This is also a 3-mana 3/2 on its own, which can sometimes find a way to get it done all on its own. I think this is a pretty strong card, one you’ll first pick pretty often, but probably not quite a bomb.

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Guild Thief

AI Rating: 3.1
Pro Rating: 2.5

It is nice that this becomes larger when it hits players, but as a two mana 1/1 it won’t be doing that a whole lot without some extra help. It can eventually become unblockable of course, but paying 4 to make your 1/1 unblockable is going to feel really bad sometimes, especially because the Thief is so darn easy to kill. Sometimes you’ll be able to get a blocker out of the way and really get going with it, though.

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Iymrith, Desert Doom

AI Rating: 5
Pro Rating: 5.0

This really reminds me of Dragonlord Ojutai, and that’s a nice comparison, since that was a massive bomb! The Ward effect will make it so that you get to attack your opponent with it at least once in most cases, and if you’re attacking with a 5/5 flyer there’s a good chance that you will either draw a card or force them chump, either way you’re getting at least a 2-for-1 out of the exchange, and that’s kind of the best case for your opponent, because if you start drawing cards off of this, its just over.

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Mind Flayer

AI Rating: 4.6
Pro Rating: 4.0

Mind Control effects are one of the most powerful things in Magic, especially in Limited. Stealing an opposing creature means you add to the board while subtracting from theirs, and that’s just huge! Mind Flayer does come with the downside of not being anywhere near a permanent version of the effect, since as a 3/3, he can be easily killed and your opponent can get the creature back. But, the upside here is crazy, as getting a 3/3 + whatever your opponent’s best creature is will be a great deal for 5 mana. I do think the vulnerability of the Flayer keeps this out of “bomb” range, but just barely.

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Mordenkainen

AI Rating: 4.9
Pro Rating: 4.5

If you’re paying 6 for a planeswalker, he’d better be good! And Mordenkainen is. The best Limited planeswalkers are the ones that can do at least two of the three following things: Draw you cards, protect themselves, or act as removal. Mordenkainen does the first two of those. His +2 gives you some powerful card draw and card selection that rapidly raises his loyalty. And, his -2 creates a token that can protect him. Now, it is a little annoying that you have to make sure you have at least one card in your hand all the time for the token to not die, but the upside is that you can also make it significant larger. Two cards in your hand makes it a 4/4, and that’s just going to happen a lot, especially because he draws you cards! If you managed to get to his ultimate, he’ll then draw you a whole bunch of cards, and it is hard not to lose at that point. Mostly, you’ll probably alternate between +2 and -2 with him most of the time, and that will be plenty to win you the game.

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Mordenkainen's Polymorph

AI Rating: -0
Pro Rating: 1.0

This kind of card always looks really cool, and that’s because it is easy to think of situations where it does something. But, even though there are several of them -- like making a creature big enough to block something it couldn’t before, or shrinking an opposing creature, or doing 4 lethal damage int he air, or saving a creature from damage-based removal -- even with all of those possibilities, you’d be surprised how infrequently a situation emerges where this will actually do something. We’ve seen a ton of cards like this over the years, and they always significantly underperform. I can’t see that changing here.

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Pixie Guide

AI Rating: 1.9
Pro Rating: 2.0

This has a reasonable floor. Two mana ⅓ flyers tend to be sort of acceptable in Limited, and the upsider here is pretty alright too. UR especially will be able to take advantage of the effect, but most decks that are at least part Blue will probably have 2-3 cards that involve a d20, so it will come up some. This isn’t especially close to good, though it isn’t bad either.

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Power of Persuasion

AI Rating: 1.7
Pro Rating: 3.0

Rolling 1-9 here isn’t going to feel very good, as you’re just not getting your 3 mana’s worth to bounce something at Sorcery speed, but the good news is that other rolls will give you about what you’d expect -- and that’s a pseudo Time Ebb effect for 10-19, and a temporary mind control for 20. The 10-19 effect actually lets you go 1 for 1 on cards, and obviously the mind control will feel like a 2-for-1. So, yeah the 1-9 might be a bit of a bummer, but hey, at least it interacts with the opposing board and gets something off of it, which will at least give you some tempo.

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Ray of Frost

AI Rating: 2.8
Pro Rating: 3.0

This whole cycle of color hosers is nice, because they are all perfectly playable cards even if you don’t play against the color they hate on, and when you do play against them, the cards in this cycle will get a massive upgrade, and that’s certainly the case here. The fact this doesn’t tap the creature itself is pretty rough, as you have to wait until your opponent has a tapped creature for it to really do something. The fact it has Flash does make it easier for you to find that window, but if this card didn’t have the Red-hating upside, it would probably just be a 2.5. And, against decks with Red targets for this, it will feel premium

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Rimeshield Frost Giant

AI Rating: 1.1
Pro Rating: 3.0

Ward 3 is pretty big, and for a creature this size, it may just feel like Hexproof some games, since your opponent will need a pretty hefty removal spell to deal with it in most cases, and it will be pretty hard for your opponent to ever take it down without paying at least what you paid for the Giant.

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Scion of Stygia

AI Rating: 2
Pro Rating: 3.0

If you know me, you know I’m a pretty big fan of Blue creatures with bounce or tap down effects, and this is a distinctly D & D version of it, but it seems pretty good to me. The nice thing about it is, even if you roll 1-9 with it, you’re getting reasonable value out of a 3-mana 2/1, and the tap down might prevent an attack or enable a better one for you. Then, when you hit 10-20, which is slightly more likely, you’re going to feel like you’ve got an amazing deal. Basically, 1-9 this will feel like a 2.0, and 11-20 will feel like a 3.5. I think that means it gets a 3.0

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Secret Door

AI Rating: 0.6
Pro Rating: 1.5

In the early game, this can block reasonably well, and in the late game it has an ability that is a reasonable mana sink, and one that can actually give you a ton of value. Only Venturing at Sorcery speed is rough of course, because you have to telegraph to your opponent you won’t be interacting with them, but if you’re flooding out, this ability is going to look pretty good. You probably still don’t play this a ton though.

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Shocking Grasp

AI Rating: 0.3
Pro Rating: 1.5

The effect here isn’t very exciting. This Blue “combat tricks” really need your board to already have something big enough to deal with an attacking creature, or to blow up a block, and that really makes them pretty unimpressive. Obviously, adding a cantrip to the card does it make it better, because it means that at worse, you’re going to be able to Cycle this, but it still isn’t something that will make the cut in your deck all that often.

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Shortcut Seeker

AI Rating: 1.3
Pro Rating: 2.0

This has some okay defensive stats, but unfortunately it needs to do damage to a player to actually do something real, making it kind of an odd card. UB is going to be pretty good at making creatures gain evasion, but I’m not super interested in this.

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Silver Raven

AI Rating: 0.2
Pro Rating: 1.5

One mana 1/1 flyers don’t tend to be very impressive in most Limited formats unless they have a lot going on. And, while Scry 1 is a little more than nothing, it isn’t that good, either. It does mean it still does a thing in the late game, and improving your draws matters, but yeah, this is pretty mediocre overall. If the set had more of an Artifact theme it would be better, but it just isn’t there.

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Soulknife Spy

AI Rating: 2.4
Pro Rating: 3.0

Creatures with this combat trigger tend to be pretty nice in Limited, and this one has more reasonable stats than the ones we usually see at lower rarities. Drawing a card is big, and is the kind of thing your opponent will have to account for one way or another, or the extra cards this gets you will help you win the game. It doesn’t hurt that UB has a significant number of ways to make the creature evasive, either! One particularly nasty combo that you’ll see a lot, because the two cards are Common and Uncommon two will be Fly + Soulknife spy.

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Split the Party

AI Rating: 1
Pro Rating: 2.5

This is a unique design for a bounce spell, and I think most of the time it will be pretty alright. You probably want to be bouncing two things with it to feel good about the amount of mana you spend on it, and you can do that as long as they have three creatures since it is rounded up. There will be times where it just doesn’t matter though, even when you bounce a couple of things. A decent chunk of the time, this will either simply delay the inevitable. This kind of effect does not allow you to trade card-for-card and is pure tempo, so keep that in mind. I think overall, that just makes this a 2.5

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Sudden Insight

AI Rating: 0.7
Pro Rating: 2.5

This won’t always be that easy to get going, especially because this set doesn’t really have a big graveyard theme, but in the late game it seems pretty likely to draw you 3+ cards, and obviously it can do even more than that. It does cost 6, and it is utterly terrible until the relatively late game, so it is hard to get overly excited about it, but I think it is a decent draw spell to have a single copy of in your Blue decks.

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Tasha's Hideous Laughter

AI Rating: 2.8
Pro Rating: 2.5

I tend to be skeptical of mill in most formats where it isn’t really a dedicated archetype, but I kind of think a good control deck can probably treat Tasha’s Hideous Laughter as a win condition. Your opponent’s deck will have 33 cards in it at the beginning of the game, and obviously that number gets continually smaller. Hideous Laughter won’t always work out the way you want it to, but I would imagine milling about 10 cards with it is a reasonable expectation. Sometimes it won’t work out that way, and sometimes it will be better, but I think 10 is a good place to look with this. Decks are small enough and this mills enough cards that it should have some real potential. Still, probably only in the most controlling of decks.

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Trickster's Talisman

AI Rating: 2.5
Pro Rating: 3.0

This gives a decent stats boost for the cost, and the option to give up the Talisman to copy a creature is going to be pretty busted sometimes

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True Polymorph

AI Rating: 2.2
Pro Rating: 1.0

This is pretty expensive, but it can really reshape the board in a big way. You can use it to make an opposing creature into the weakest creature on the table, or you can make one of yours a copy of the best creature. You can do it at Instant speed too, which means in some cases this can turn into a removal spell of sorts. This kind of spell is always more narrow than it looks though. You have to be significantly upgrading or downgrading a creature for the massive mana cost to be worth it, and you’ll find yourself staring at boards pretty often where this just won’t do the thing you want it to do. I feel like this is both too narrow and too expensive to be something you want to play most of the time.

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Wizard Class

AI Rating: 3.7
Pro Rating: 3.0

This is much less buildaroundy than most of the other Classes, and that’s good news, because it will just be nice in any Blue deck, though it does get better the better you are at drawing cards. The level one Enchantment is pretty irrelevant, but drawing two at level two will feel nice, and obviously leveling this up all the way will feel great, as getting a counter every turn is quite nice. It is quite slow, of course, and that holds it back significantly, but I think it looks pretty nice overall.

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Wizard's Spellbook

AI Rating: 3.6
Pro Rating: 4.0

This thing is slow, but boy -- it is going to win you the game if you get to use it even twice. Any of the rolls are pretty darn good. 1-9 lets you Flashback a spell, 10-19 lets you cast it for 1, and 20 is going to let you cast it and whatever other spells you’ve exiled with it for free. This does cost 7, but if you play it when you have 8, you can at least take a crack at copying a spell that first turn. Sometimes you won’t be able to do that and that will feel kind of rough -- paying 7 for something that doesn’t actually effect the board right away. But luckily the ability costs 0, so thereafter, you’ll be able to use it to great effect for the remainder of the game. It is still hard to get over how slow this is, and this format doesn’t exactly appear to be a slow one, but I am pretty high on this card to start the format.

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You Come to a River

AI Rating: 1.1
Pro Rating: 3.0

This is a solid modal card. Usually, just a card that does the “Fight the Current” option, is something that makes the cut a decent chunk of the time. It has the flexibility of dealing, at least temporarily, with multiple permanent types, and you can even use it to actually take away a card permanently if your opponent tries to put auras or combat tricks on their creatures. The other option you’ll basically only choose when its lethal, but that is some nice upside to have on an already solid card.

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You Find the Villains' Lair

AI Rating: 0.8
Pro Rating: 2.0

Cancel is not usually a great card in Limited. Counterspells are a little too situational, and it is often just going ot be better to add to your board with three mana than count on your opponent playing something that you will counter. In a lot of ways, counter magic in Limited is just bad removal, because you have to have the mana up to use it at the exact right time, or it doesn’t do anything. Basically, a card like Cancel just ends up being a card you have left in your hand after you’ve played everything else, and it might do a thing, but it also might have cost you the game. This gets around that problem with another mode though. Sure, it doesn’t add to the board either, but it still gives you something to do with it that will be more immediate and more of a sure thing in situations where that’s a good idea. Normally, Cancel is like a 1.5, but I think this does enough to make the cut more often than that.

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You See a Guard Approach

AI Rating: 0.2
Pro Rating: 1.0

Individually, these effects are not worth an entire card. They’re just too situational. Sure, it feels good to give your creature hexproof in response to removal, but there will be lots of times where that effect doesn’t matter. The tap effect is even more underwhelming, and while it can allow you to stop something from attacking you, or maybe help you attack more effectively, it will also be useless a decent chunk of the time. Each of those, cards, individually -- would be almost unplayable. If you put them together, you obviously have a better card that you’ll actually be able to use sometimes, but I still don’t think it is very good.

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Yuan-Ti Malison

AI Rating: 4.5
Pro Rating: 4.0

Woo boy, this is a very powerful two drop, the kind that can take over a game, and that’s not something one often says about two drops! It can be unblockable for as long as you want it to be, and that part of the card alone would be a card you basically never cut. The adventure trigger is amazing, and will quickly give you a ton of value. Left unchecked, this two drop can legitimately end games. I do think it falls just short of bomb status since it is so easy to kill, but it gets about as close as any two drop can get.

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Acererak the Archlich

AI Rating: 4.9
Pro Rating: 4.0

So, up until you complete the Tomb of Annihilation, this is basically a 3 mana spell that says “Venture into a dungeon” that you can cast every turn. If that’s all this was, this would be a decent card. Think of it like having a mana sink that lets you Venture, and you can see how nice that can be in the later part of the game to grind out value. Then, once you do complete the dungeon, you get a 5/5 who will either make your opponent sacrifice a creature or give you a Zombie when it attacks. So, the tricky thing here is that you’re basically never going to play Acererak on turn three, like one wants to do. Tomb of Annihilation is the easiest of the Dungeons to complete, since one can do it in three Ventures. However, it is also definitely the trickiest of the dungeons to take advantage of, as a result of the fact that its effects are either symmetrical bad things, or just bad things that happen to you., up until you reach the last room. But, with all that mind, Acererak still seems really good. He lets you venture, which there is all sorts of synergy for in this set, and he is a large, scary threat at most stages of the game. I don’t quite thing Acererak will be a bomb, because the set up cost is significant, but its close

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Asmodeus the Archfiend

AI Rating: 3.9
Pro Rating: 3.0

6 –mana for a 6/6 is nice, but the downside of course is that you can’t really draw cards when it is in play, instead they get exiled. You can get those cards back of course, but it will cost you some life. Paying three black to draw 7 and then an additional black to get those 7 cards will cost a lot of life, but it seems like in most scenarios you will get pretty insurmountable card advantage out of that, and 7 life will be worth it. The fact it costs triple black to draw those seven is a little annoying, as that isn’t mana that you’ll always have in Limited. In general, I think Asmodeus will sometimes feel like more downside than upside in Limited, but the amount of power he brings Is pretty amazing, though certainly not bomb level. That downside is too significant.

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Baleful Beholder

AI Rating: 1.4
Pro Rating: 3.0

If you’re looking for some kind of finisher in a Black deck, this Beholder isn’t a terrible place to turn. Sometimes giving menace to your whole time will just win you the game on the spot, other times it won’t do anything --- the average situation is probably somewhere in the middle. Like, it lets one of your creatures attack who couldn’t, but that’s still not bad when attached to a 6-mana 6/5. Additionally, the fact it can get rid of Enchantments in a pinch is nice too.

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Black Dragon

AI Rating: 3.8
Pro Rating: 3.5

This is expensive, but it will have a huge impact on the board when you play it. It will virtually always be able to kill something of your opponent’s, and trust me -- playing a 4/4 Flyer and subtracting from your opponent’s side of the board is pretty game-changing. It won’t always let you take down their biggest, baddest creature, but this card will still swing games in your favor pretty effectively. It is a very impressive Uncommon. If this format ends up being really fast, it might slip a little bit, but for now I think it is pretty great.

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The Book of Vile Darkness

AI Rating: 2.8
Pro Rating: 0.0

So, setting things up to make the Zombie God just won’t happen in Limited without some incredible luck, so we’ll disregard that. Mostly, this gives you a Zombie at the end of your turn if you lost 2 or more life, and losing life on your own turn isn’t something that will just happen -- you’ll have to create situations to make that part work, and even though Black is always capable of doing that in Limited, it is highly unlikely you get a critical mass of those cards going that allows you to consistently make a Zombie, and you probably need to get at least two out of this for it to feel worth it. And that’s going to be way too hard to do.

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Check for Traps

AI Rating: 2
Pro Rating: 2.0

This kind of discard spell is usually worth playing in Limited. The fact it can hit anything is a pretty big deal, and means it has utility pretty much all game long. The additional instant/flash upside can even matter a little bit!

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Clattering Skeletons

AI Rating: 1.9
Pro Rating: 3.0

A 4-mana 4/3 is fine, and this comes with a nice enough death trigger. Venturing is going to be a big part of this format -- think learn/lessons in Strixhaven -- so any card that can do it for you is going to be a little better than it looks.

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Deadly Dispute

AI Rating: 1.8
Pro Rating: 2.0

The prevalence of treasure, especially in Black-Red, will make this better than it looks. This kind of effect often plays a lot like Tormenting Voice, which is to say – its pretty replaceable, but I think this will be better than usual thanks to the fact it is good with treasure and it produces treasure. It of course still comes with the upside of being able to sacrifice a creature in response to removal, at which point you really aren’t going down a card either.

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Death-Priest of Myrkul

AI Rating: 4
Pro Rating: 4.0

This card really feels like a Rare, and that’s always a good sign for an Uncommon! Sure, he has some ugly stats for the cost, but everything else going on here is great. There are enough creatures with those types in Black in this set that it will be pumping 3-5 of the creatures in your deck, and sometimes more, but the real value comes from the ability to make 1/1 Skeletons, which, if the Deathpriest is in play, will of course be 2/2 skeletons! You won’t always be able to trigger that effortlessly, but it will happen often enough for the Deathpriest to be a very real problem for your opponent, and the great thing is, after you make that first one, you’re going to be getting value even if they do find removal for it!

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Demogorgon's Clutches

AI Rating: 1.4
Pro Rating: 1.5

They continue to print Mind Rots that are at least somewhat reasonable in Limited, and that’s a good trend I think. The problem with the discard part of this card is how much its usefulness decreases in the late game, like it is usually a god awful top deck to draw your Mind Rot late. And, early, it is often better to just add to the board. So there’s sort of a sweet spot of a few turns where you kind of hope you get the card where it will feel at its best. That’s why straight up Mind Rot is usually like a 1.0. However, by adding some additional effects to the card – especially the part where your opponent loses 2 life --- it makes it so this Mind Rot actually does something even late. It still isn’t good late, mind you, but it is better than most of its predecessors.

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Devour Intellect

AI Rating: 0.1
Pro Rating: 0.5 // 2.5

Letting your opponent choose to discard whatever they want this is not very good, but with Treasure you can turn it into a better Thoughtseize, and that’s pretty neat. I think this really needs a build around grade, because it is pretty awful in a deck with 0 treasure, but if you are BR, you’ll probably have the Treasure you need to make this work pretty well. Still, a card like this is better in the early game, and has diminishing returns as the game goes on, and you can’t count having treasure early, so don’t expect to fire this off on turn one or two for the more effective mode

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Drider

AI Rating: 2.9
Pro Rating: 3.0

This doesn’t have good base stats, but it does have a good combat damage trigger. Even just getting one Spider out of this will feel great, and it feels like UB is well-equipped with enough ways to make this evasive that it will feel pretty strong when it lines up that way. It won’t always do that though, and sometimes it will just be an inefficient creature.

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Dungeon Crawler

AI Rating: 2.1
Pro Rating: 2.5

One mana 2/1s don’t tend to be amazing in Limited, largely because everyone plays lots of creatures, and they’ll get bigger than it in a hurry! However, the upside of this returning to your hand when you complete a dungeon is pretty nice. Even if it is just a 2/1, getting it back for even once in the game will feel pretty good. And, if you’re in Black, I think it is pretty likely you complete at least one dungeon over the course of the game.

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Ebondeath, Dracolich

AI Rating: 5
Pro Rating: 5.0

A 4-mana 5/2 Flyer with Flash is already a great card, even coming into play tapped. That’s just a ton of damage in the air, and very efficient. So...the fact you can just keep casting Dracolith over and over again is a big deal. The limitation here is relevant, but as long as you have something die that isn’t named Dracolith, it will basically be in your hand again, ready to be cast, and that’s pretty insane. This is a bomb.

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Eyes of the Beholder

AI Rating: 1.1
Pro Rating: 3.0

It is pretty difficult for a card to be premium removal when it costs 6 mana – unless of course it also draws you a card, like Rise of Extus in Strixhaven. Eye of the Beholder can definitely kill almost everything, but six mana is a whole lot! It is an Instant, which does means sometimes you’ll be able to manufacture some blowouts. I think you’ll always be reasonably happy with the first copy of this, but running more than that is pretty risky.

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Fates' Reversal

AI Rating: 1.4
Pro Rating: 2.5

So, usually Black has a common that lets you return two creatures, and it is usually a serviceable enough card that you basically always want the first copy of. They are situational, since they don’t do anything until late, but they can really help you grind out a win. This doesn’t do that exactly but I could see it offering similar value sometimes as a creature + Venture won’t feel too shabby.

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Feign Death

AI Rating: 0.9
Pro Rating: 1.5

Versions of this effect that are good tend to give the stats boost up front. That’s significantly better than this because it allows a smaller creature to win combat against something bigger, but this doesn’t do that. Sometimes you’ll just have to use it on a chump block, which won’t feel great. It is nice that it basically counters most removal, and it isn’t bad, just not like Supernatural Stamina or other cards we’ve seen that have been pretty solid. This just won’t do enough to make the cut super often.

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Forsworn Paladin

AI Rating: 4.6
Pro Rating: 4.0

This looks pretty good. First, it provides some nice fixing and ramp since it can churn out treasure, and then it also has an ability that is a pretty potent Treasure payoff. Even without treasure, the ability to pump something +2/+0 would feel pretty good, but if you can give that thing death touch, that’s when things will get really interesting. This is nice too, because one of the things it looks like treasure decks will want is mana sinks, and Forsworn Paladin is nice there as well. On top of all of that, it is a one mana 1/1 with Menace, a creature that can attack fairly effectively in the early game, and which can pump itself with its ability, so if you have the ability to give it death touch, you’ll be taking down two things no matter how your opponent blocks. The whole package makes for quite an impressive one drop.

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Gelatinous Cube

AI Rating: 4.8
Pro Rating: 4.5

A 4-mana 4/3 that exiles an opposing creature is excellent. And sure, if your opponent kills the Cube they’re going to get back the creature -- but, given enough time you can “dissolve” that creature, which will make it so they won’t get it back. Even without that Dissolve effect, this is basically Ravenous Chupacabra, and with it, it is way better. I think this gets in the lower range of “bomb” territory.

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Grim Bounty

AI Rating: 4.1
Pro Rating: 3.5

This is premium removal. It might be a somewhat expensive Sorcery, but it kills pretty much everything for 4 mana, and even gives you a treasure back, almost making it so it costs three mana with some fixing upside!

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Grim Wanderer

AI Rating: 3.4
Pro Rating: 2.0

This is a strange card to evaluate. Obviously on the vanilla test it is incredible, but the requirement of a creature needing to die is harder to set up than you might think. It does have Flash, which means that you can more easily find a situation where you can cast it, but keep in mind the kind of Flash it has will almost never allow you to use it to ambush your opponent, because a creature probably won’t die until combat. Still, it isn’t hard to imagine a situation where you and your opponent trade two drops and you play this at the end of their turn, and if you can do that, it will be quite imposing. A 5/3 even in the late game isn’t too bad, and you may be able to double spell because it is so cheap. The big downside is you literally can’t cast it at all if something hasnt’ died. It would be much better even if it cost like 6 or 7 or something as a base cost, and then got reduce dwhen something died, but sometimes this will just be stuck in your hand, or to get it going you have to block in an ugly way or something like that, and that really tempers my expectations here.

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Herald of Hadar

AI Rating: 1
Pro Rating: 1.5

This is a bit clunky as a 5-mana 4/4, but the activated ability, as expensive as it is -- is a pretty nice late game mana sink. The ability, no matter what you roll, provides some serious reach. It is probably still too slow to make the cut on a super regular basis, though.

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Hired Hexblade

AI Rating: 1.8
Pro Rating: 3.0

This seems like a solid card. Worst-case, you have a grizzly bear, and best case you have a two mana 2/2 that draws you a card -- which is just a great deal. There is enough treasure in this set that casting this with it isn’t a pipe dream, but you probably shouldn’t expect to be able to do it on turn two. Still, playing this later, once you have that treasure, will be nice since it will have relevance in the late game too when you do it.

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Hoard Robber

AI Rating: 2.1
Pro Rating: 1.0

It is nice that this can make treasure, but a 1/3 just isn’t going to be getting in very often without some significant help. I don’t think you play this most of the time.

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Lightfoot Rogue

AI Rating: 3.2
Pro Rating: 2.5

This is a solid two-drop, though not an overly impressive one for an Uncommon. What you get out of a roll 1-10 and 11-19 really isn’t that different in most scenarios, but it is nice that this gains death touch when it attacks, meaning that your opponent has to give something up to kill it. Unfortunately, the format seems to have enough 1/1 tokens lying around that that isn’t that impressive. Obviously rolling a 20 with it will make it super amazing, but it won’t do that most of the time. It also has the very real downside of not having death touch on defense. One of the nice things about death touch is how good it is both attacking and blocking, but you don’t really get that upside here.

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Lolth, Spider Queen

AI Rating: 5
Pro Rating: 5.0

Well, as is often the case, this planeswalker is a stone cold bomb. The best Limited planeswalkers tend to need two of the following three: Card draw, a removal effect, and a way to protect themselves. Lolth comes away with two of those, and both her main abilities are just great. A 0 loyalty ability that draws you a card is going to be nice if you’re ahead, and if you’re behind you can use her -3, and because her Spider friends have Reach, it is going to be difficult for your opponent to go after Lolth very effectively. Those Spiders also have Menace, so they can be quite intimidating attackers sometimes too. The great thing is that her static ability will give her more loyalty counters -- and this means her -3 will feel more like a -2 in some cases. He ultimate emblem is definitely an odd one, but if you get there, it is the kind that will probably win you the game in the long run -- although her spiders and card draw might accomplish that before you get to use it.

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Manticore

AI Rating: 1.7
Pro Rating: 3.0

These types of “kill something that was damaged” effects are often underwhelming, just because it takes more work than you'd think to consistently manufacture situations where that happens -- in particular, situations where you can make it happen without giving up significant resources, like an ugly block or an attack. However, when they add Flash to the mix, the card gets significantly more interesting because it means there will be a wider variety of situations where you can make that part of the card work. Plus, in a fail case this gives you a passable Flying body. Don’t count on this to feel like a Flying Ravenous Chupacabra all the time, but it will do that often enough to be a pretty nice common.

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Power Word Kill

AI Rating: 4.5
Pro Rating: 4.0

This will be able to kill most stuff really efficiently, and will basically feel like doom blade – but mostly better. Doom Blade can’t hit a whole color of creatures, Power Word Kill can’t hit a few creature types. At Common and Uncommon, this set has 1 Angel, 0 demons, 0 devils, and 7 Dragons. And none of those Dragons are Common! There are a few more of these things at Rare and Mythic, but you get the picture – this kills almost everything incredibly efficiently. I’m sure there will be frustrating times where you can’t kill your opponent’s bomb, , but most of the time it will do the job very efficiently. This is premium removal, and one of the best non-rares in the format.

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Precipitous Drop

AI Rating: 3.4
Pro Rating: 3.5

I think I would play this most of the time even without the “completed dungeon” bonus. The Aura + Venture is going to be good enough for that, and then the completed dungeon bonus makes this far more potent. One nice thing about this card is that you can stick it on a creature and then get the bonus later once you complete a dungeon, at which point it slikely to just kill whatever it is. I think this gets into the lower range of premium.

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Ray of Enfeeblement

AI Rating: 3.2
Pro Rating: 3.0

One mana for -4/-1 to a creature is already a pretty nice deal. It won’t outright kill all of them, but they will certainly be enfeebled enough to be taken down in combat pretty much all the time, and that will feel pretty efficient. Then, against people playing White, it gets a massive upgrade to the point it is one of the best cards in your deck.

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Reaper's Talisman

AI Rating: 3.6
Pro Rating: 3.0

This looks like some pretty nice Equipment. One to play and two to equip for Death touch and an “attacks alone” trigger is kind of an okay deal, especially because those two things pair so well together. You often would find yourself rumbling with just a small death toucher anyway, so draining two on top of that will be a very real problem for your opponent. Keep in mind, the creature only has death touch on the attack, so don’t move this to a blocker and expect it to have death touch.

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Sepulcher Ghoul

AI Rating: 1.8
Pro Rating: 2.5

This has passable base stats, and on most attacks it will be able to threaten becoming a 4/3, so your opponent will have to take that into account. Free sacrifice effects like this always play pretty well since you can virtually always use the effect, though in this case, you can only do it once. It looks like the Ghoul is well-positioned for the BG deck especially, since that deck’s all about stuff dying, and it will also pair nicely in BR, where you can use the Threaten effect to steal a creature and sacrifice it. I think all of that helps makes this two mana 2/1 a card you play a significant chunk of the time in Black.

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Shambling Ghast

AI Rating: 2.1
Pro Rating: 2.5

This looks like a nice little one drop to me. It can be a real pain if your opponent has two X/1s in play, since you can make a two-for-one out of your one drop, and those situations will happen. And the good news is, when the -1/-1 part isn’t useful -- and it won’t always be -- you get to make a treasure, which means this little one drop gives you fixing and ramp pretty early on in the game.

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Skullport Merchant

AI Rating: 4.1
Pro Rating: 3.0

So, this is a Black Sailor of Means with upside, and that’s a really good place to start. Tacking on fixing and ramp to a creature like this just ends up feeling really great. Sometimes you won’t really want the treasure, so its great that he can cash them in for cards, as well as creatures!

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Sphere of Annihilation

AI Rating: 3.8
Pro Rating: 4.0

This iis of course symmetrical, but because you get to decide the mana to pay for it, you will be able to find a way to make it feel less symmetrical most of the time. It is a big bummer that it doesn’t do anything immediately. Waiting a whole turn for it to do its thing will sometimes feel way too slow, especially if you’re behind. So, the card is a bit finicky. You need the mana value to line up well, and you have to wait an entire turn for it to do something. Even with all that in mind, I think this is a reasonably powerful card, though all of those variables don’t make it super amazing. I think I’m going to start the format valuing it fairly highly though, and playing it in pretty much any Black deck where I can get it. This type of effect just is not easily replaceable.

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Thieves' Tools

AI Rating: 1.9
Pro Rating: 2.5

This will fight nicely into UB, because that color is all about making small creatures evasive and getting value when they do combat damage, and it will fit nicely in BR because it likes treasures.

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Vampire Spawn

AI Rating: 1.7
Pro Rating: 2.5

This might not quite be Siege Rhino, but it seems pretty nice. A 3-mana 2/3 isn’t where you want to be normally, but the ETB trigger here is pretty real. It is a bit odd that Black doesn’t really care about life gain this time around, but that’s okay. The drain effect here is a total net gain of 4 life – in other words, it creates a gap of 4 life between you and your opponent, and that’s pretty nice in a race. This seems like a solid playable.

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Vorpal Sword

AI Rating: 4.6
Pro Rating: 4.0

+2/+0 and Death Touch is a nice boost for a one-mana to play two to equip Equipment. Now, the Equip cost being double black will sometimes be a bummer in Limited, as you can’t always get your double colored mana when you want to, but even with that bit of downside, this is going to be great. Virtually every creature you put this on will become a threat, and it can even be used sort of defensively thanks to death touch. The big 8 mana ability might not come up a ton -- but it will sometimes, and its just upside on an already great card anyway.

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Warlock Class

AI Rating: 3.3
Pro Rating: 2.5

The Level 1 of this wouldn’t be worth it on its own, as using up a whole card for a fairly mediocre “morbid” effect that will only trigger every couple of turns or so just isn’t what you want to be doing. Now, it is nice that when you take it to level two, it draws you a card, and I do think that if we looked at this as 2B for an Enchantment with the Morbid ability + the card selection effect, you’d probably play that card. Then, in the late came it can level up and get a pretty powerful effect, but it is worth noting that that effect is really only going to do something if you’re already ahead in most cases. I think the whole package is probably a solid playable.

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Westgate Regent

AI Rating: 4.9
Pro Rating: 5.0

You would be reasonably happy with a vanilla 5-mana 4/4 Flyer, so adding a lot more text to that card is great. First, the Ward effect makes it virtually impossible for your opponent not to get 2-for-1’d by the Regent, since they will have to discard a card just to target it in the first place. Second, the longer the Regent stays around, the larger it will get as it damages your opponent, accelerating their clock significantly. So, he ticks a lot of marks that make him a bomb. He will win you the game if left unchecked, and because of Ward he will have some negative effect on your opponent in almost all situations.

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Wight

AI Rating: 4.7
Pro Rating: 3.5

A two-mana 3/2 that enters tapped would already be a decent playable, but the additional effect here is quite good. Most of the time you won’t be making more than one Zombie, but that’s fine. if you are up against this card, trading with it will feel pretty miserable because of that Zombie token. You can even triple block something huge to take it down and still get back a little bit of value. Basically, it is a nice attacker and blocker that replaces itself. It isn’t super exciting, but it is definitely pretty good.

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Yuan-Ti Fang-Blade

AI Rating: 3.1
Pro Rating: 2.5

This has a powerful combat damage to a player trigger, and because it has death touch your opponent will be put in a difficult position with it sometimes. Repeatable Venturing seems pretty powerful, and UB seems the most well-positioned to help creatures like this get evasion

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Zombie Ogre

AI Rating: 1.4
Pro Rating: 2.5

This has kind decent defensive stats, but the real value comes from its ability to Venture into the Dungeon, which it can do without any mana investment at all. Sure, you have to have your creature die, but that’s a common enough occurrence that this will be able to Venture for you a decent amount of the time. Playing it in the second main phase after a creature has ALREADY died will feel particularly good, because you’ll be getting that value at your End Step most of the time. This seems like a solid Common

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Armory Veteran

AI Rating: 1.5
Pro Rating: 2.5

This has a solid baseline, and becomes pretty scary when you stick Equipment on him, as adding Menace to whatever other boost he’s getting will be formidable.

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Barbarian Class

AI Rating: 2.6
Pro Rating: 1.0 // 3.0

The base level of this one probably wouldn’t be worth it all on its own, even with all the d20 stuff in the set. It just won’t create a different outcome all that often, though obviously it does make those d20 cards better. Once you add level two, you are getting a very real payoff for rolling dice, as +2/+0 and Menace is a pretty big deal, and then Level 3 adding Haste to the mix -- regardless of Dice being rolled, seems nice. So, how good would this be if you just paid 6 up front for all of this? Well, not amazing, but paying it in installments is obviously better. Still, I think your deck will be dependent enough on having dice effects that this won’t really work in every deck, and even when it does I don’t see it being amazing. Because it is so dependent on dice, I think this needs a buildaround grade, because in your Average red deck with like 3-4 dice effects, it probably isn’t worth it. You probably need 7+ to get there.

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Battle Cry Goblin

AI Rating: 3.7
Pro Rating: 3.0

On its own, this is a two mana 2/2 that can pump its power and can Haste for 1R, which is usually a pretty decent card in Limited. The Pack Tactics effect here isn’t the most impressive, but adding another body to the board that can have its power pumped can sometimes matter, and obviously, if you end up with a lot of Goblins -- and there are lots of Goblins in this set -- this gets even better.

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Boots of Speed

AI Rating: 1.1
Pro Rating: 2.0

The boost this offers for the casting cost and the equip cost is pretty reasonable, as paying one more to give something new Haste and +1/+0 will feel pretty good sometimes, especially in a set where there’s an Equipment archetype.

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Brazen Dwarf

AI Rating: 0.5
Pro Rating: 1.0

This doesn’t look very good. A two mana ⅓ isn’t a good stat-line these days, and the fact it might damage your opponent a little bit doesn’t really make up for that for me. It just won’t do enough to feel worth the mana or the card in most decks.

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Burning Hands

AI Rating: 3.7
Pro Rating: 3.5

As we’ve seen with most of this cycle, this is a pretty good card even without the color hosing effect. Normally, two mana to do 2 to something at Instant speed would probably be a 2.5. It isn’t quite premium, just because it can only kill small stuff and not that efficiently. However, I do think adding the huge upside against Green permanents in a big deal, as when you go against a Green deck this will feel like a 4.0!

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Chaos Channeler

AI Rating: 3.8
Pro Rating: 4.0

This seems really good. It is a 4-mana 4/3 with a ton of upside. No matter what you roll when it attacks, you will end up netting at least one card. And because it says “play” you can even play lands off of it, and that’s awesome. He might die after only one attack, but you’ll usually be getting a 2-for-1 out of it, so that’s fine with me, especially because if left unchecked, the Channeler will just keep drawing you cards.

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Critical Hit

AI Rating: 1.1
Pro Rating: 1.0

Two mana for double strike alone isn’t the most impressive trick. The creature you use it on generally already has to be fairly impressive for it to be worthwhile, and it won’t even always allow you to win combat if your creature isn’t big enough. It is easy to imagine using this on your 6/6 Trampler, and that will happen sometimes, but you have to think of all the situations where the effect is negligible, which will be the majority of the time. The whole “natural 20” thing is cute, but won’t happen often enough for that to factor into the grade much.

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Delina, Wild Mage

AI Rating: 4.7
Pro Rating: 3.5

So, a 4-mana 3/2 that makes a temporary attacking copy of an attacking creature when IT attacks is a nice enough card, and in this case Delina can actually target herself since the copy won’t be legendary. Mostly, she’ll just be making one copy, but that’s already a fairly potent card. If you hit 14-20 she’ll just get silly, since she’ll make (at least!) two copies. She is fragile,and sometimes she won’t have any friends it is worth making a copy of, but it seems like she’ll shake up the board state significantly most of the time when she comes down.

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Dragon's Fire

AI Rating: 3.9
Pro Rating: 4.0

Two mana for 3 damage is always premium removal, and this has some pretty relevant dragon upside that can make it an even better removal spell

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Dueling Rapier

AI Rating: 1.2
Pro Rating: 2.5

So, the Equip cost here is obviously really steep, and +2/+0 for a single Red mana would not be an awesome combat trick, but in this case we’re talking about a combat trick that has the stats boost stick around in one form or another. Even if your creature dies, you have something on the battlefield, even if it does cost a lot to Equip, and if you can help a creature win and survive combat and keep this equipped to it, it’s going ot feel pretty good. In a lot of ways, it is still a glorified combat trick, but I’ve underestimated auras and equipment with Flash in the past, dismissing them as combat tricks, so I thinkt his will defy expectations. Still, it probably isn’t much more than a solid playable.

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Earth-Cult Elemental

AI Rating: 1.4
Pro Rating: 2.5

This offers some decent top-of-the-curve stats for Limited, and it has a pretty nice D20 ability. It won’t be awesome to roll 1-9, but the effect is at least symmetrical. It will be true that sometimes it doesn’t hurt your opponent as much as it hurts you, but the opposite will sometimes be true too. Then, the effect is one sided if you roll a 10 or more, which will be well worth the mana you spend. If you always roll 10-20 with it, it is probably one of the better Commons in the set, but unfortunately it won’t go that way, we have to think about the fail cases too! The presence of Treasure in this set also means your opponent will have more permanents than normal to sacrifice, which weakens it further.

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Farideh's Fireball

AI Rating: 2.8
Pro Rating: 5.0

I think this sneaks into the lower range of premium removal. 5 mana to do 5 to something at Instant speed is perhaps not the most efficient thing ever, but it does kill most stuff, and the fac that your opponent also always takes 2 is enough to nudge this into that premium range. Sure, it will do 2 to you sometimes too, but that’s okay. This is the kind of card that will plummet in its score if the format turns out to be fast though, so keep that in mind.

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Flameskull

AI Rating: 4.6
Pro Rating: 4.5

This has nice aggressive flying stats to begin with -- if that’s all this was, it would be a very playable card, but the Rejuvenation ability here is big. Either you can just cast Flameskull again and keep pressuring your opponent in the air, or you can cast whatever other card got exiled. I suspect casting Flameskull will be right more often than not, but sometimes he’ll hit something really good that you’ll have to cast -- at which point this is a 3-mana 3/1 with Flying that drew you a card. This set does have a lot of dragons, and that may keep him in check a little bit, but he still seems quite good to me.

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Goblin Javelineer

AI Rating: 0.9
Pro Rating: 1.5

This probably won’t be great in Limited. A one mana 1/1 with Haste might feel reasonable on turn one, but it is pretty terrible thereafter, and adding the ability to ping things that block it doesn’t really make up for that, though it does help some, since it means that it can at least trade with X/2s, and X/1s effectively can’t block it. If you can find a way to give this death touch, that will unlock its full potential, but overall, I think you cut this more often than you’ll play it.

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Goblin Morningstar

AI Rating: 3.6
Pro Rating: 3.5

This looks like some pretty good Equipment ot me. While the stats boost isn’t incredible or anything, adding Trample does mean it will be nice to put on medium to large creatures, and the fact that you get a 1/1 goblin when you play it is quite nice, really making up for the other inefficiencies. It equipping to that goblin certainly is nice too, especially as a two-drop.

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Hoarding Ogre

AI Rating: 2.2
Pro Rating: 2.0

This has Hill Giant stats and a serviceable attack trigger. Because it makes treasure, you can really count this creature as fixing, and that’s typically a valuable thing to have in Limited, plus this set has some nice treasure payoffs.

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Hobgoblin Bandit Lord

AI Rating: 4.1
Pro Rating: 3.0

This set has a lot of Goblins, so the Bandit Leader’s lord effect alone would make it a pretty playable card. The other ability is where things get interesting, though. Even if you can just use it to do 1 damage at a time, it is a pretty nice ability to have around, and if you play one of several cards that puts multiple Goblin bodies on the table, Shocking stuff won’t be hard to accomplish either. The ability of course won’t always be active, even in a deck with a lot of Goblins, so keep that in mind. Still, I think the reasonable floor of a 3-mana 2/3 and the very high ceiling of Goblin Lord that can act as removal or reach is a pretty nice card.

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Hobgoblin Captain

AI Rating: 3
Pro Rating: 2.5

This looks like it might be a nice two drop for aggressive decks in the format. A two mana 3/1 is already playable in many formats, and because he supplies half the power necessary to make pack tactics go off, it seems likely he will have first strike a lot. For now, I have it at 2.5, but if aggro is huge in this format, it will probably move up.

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Hulking Bugbear

AI Rating: 3.4
Pro Rating: 3.0

Any time we see a 3-mana 3/3 with Haste it tends to be a pretty solid aggressive creature, though certainly not the most exciting card ever, but it is definitely efficient!

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Improvised Weaponry

AI Rating: 2.4
Pro Rating: 3.0

This probably isn’t quite premium removal, given that it does 2 for three mana and is a Sorcery. However, the fact that it can hit the opponent and it is a removal spell that gives you fixing and ramp is definitely appealing, even if won’t feel that efficient.

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Inferno of the Star Mounts

AI Rating: 5
Pro Rating: 4.5

Like the other Dragons in this cycle, Inferno of the Star Mounts is pretty scary. In Limited, the 20 power part will basically never happen, but a 6-mana 6/6 with Flying, Haste, and Firebreathing can end the game in a hurry. The fact it can’t be countered is some nice additional value too. While it doesn’t always do something even if it gets killed, having Haste goes a long way towards making sure something will happen the turn he comes down. The efficiency here will just put a really fast clock on your opponent, and I think that’s enough for it to get into the lower range of “bomb” territory.

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Jaded Sell-Sword

AI Rating: 1.3
Pro Rating: 3.0

A 4-mana 4/3 is passable, and the Treasure upside here is nice. It will make it a formidable attacker the turn it comes down.

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Kick in the Door

AI Rating: 0.2
Pro Rating: 2.5

This card reminds me a lot of some of the cards we saw in Strixhaven, which seemed like they didn’t really do that much, but it turned out Learning for one or two mana was good, even if the other effect was negligible, and I think that’s kind of what we’re looking at here. Without Venture, this card would be pretty close to an F. One mana for a counter and Haste and not being able to be blocked by a few creatures just wouldn’t be worth a whole card, but I think with Venture attached you suddenly have a card that will feel sort of like Guiding Voice from Strixhaven. It will make a new creature able to attack right away, or make an old one able to attack thanks to the counter, while also netting you value from Venturing.

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Magic Missile

AI Rating: 4.2
Pro Rating: 3.5

This is premium removal. These types of spells that let you divide damage are always great, because you can sometimes take down multiple creatures with them at once. And, this can also just kill X/3s reasonably efficiently, or go after the opponent to help you close out a game.

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Meteor Swarm

AI Rating: 4.5
Pro Rating: 4.0

Well, this is really good. At worst, you pay 4 to kill your opponent’s big creature, and if your opponent has a bunch of small guys in play, you can pay more to pick them all off. This isn’t quite a bomb, but it is certainly premium removal, and will reshape many games.

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Minion of the Mighty

AI Rating: 2.8
Pro Rating: 1.0

This set has a big dragon theme, but I still think setting this up so that Pack Tactics triggers will be pretty darn hard, and will sometimes feel like a win more type effect than anything. If yo’ure attacking with 6 power worth of stuff, there’s a good chance you’re already in a good position to win the game! Sure, if you are desperate this can get you a dragon down for free, but how much of a discount will it be, really? By the time you’re attacking that hard, you’re typically going to have plenty of mana in your typical game of Limited

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Orb of Dragonkind

AI Rating: 1.9
Pro Rating: 1.5

There are enough Dragons in this set for this to provide some very real fixing for you, and having the fail case of helping you find a Dragon -- which is presumably one of your better cards -- is pretty nice. I think most Red decks will find themselves with enough dragons to make this a reasonable playable, and sometimes it may even help you to splash an off-color dragon.

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Plundering Barbarian

AI Rating: 2.3
Pro Rating: 2.5

This seems like a solid card. This format has enough artifacts that this will have something to target often enough with “Smash the Chest,” and it feel great when you do that. When you don’t, it provides some reasonable fixing for you with “Pry it Open.”

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Price of Loyalty

AI Rating: 1.6
Pro Rating: 1.0 // 2.5

Even with the Treasure upside, this probably won’t be worth it for most decks. Threaten effects aren’t amazing in most formats, since they tend to do very little except in two situations. One of these is that you’re able to kill your opponent when you do it, and the other is that you have some sacrifice outlets that make it easy to turn the effect into a removal spell that gives you some value. However, this does look like it might be worth playing in the Black-Red deck, as there is one red Sacrifice effect at Uncommon, two black sacrifice effects at Common, and one at Uncommon, so setting up the sacrifice is actually going to be doable there, making the card a solid playable in a deck that gets its hands on some of those effects.

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Red Dragon

AI Rating: 3.9
Pro Rating: 3.0

Like the rest of this cycle, this looks like a nice card. A 6-mana 4/4 Flyer is almost passable, and the fact this does 4 to your opponent is kind of a big deal, as it will really accelerate your clock, and the time times when it allows you to just finish off your opponent will feel especially good. I think you can first pick this in some weaker packs.

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Rust Monster

AI Rating: 2.6
Pro Rating: 3.5

There are enough artifacts in this set that Rust Monster will be quite imposing on some boards. This is especially true because Red has so much treasure. Even the starting point here – a 3-mana 2/1 with First Strike – isn’t bad, but any time you attack with artifacts in play your opponent is going to have really hard decision to make. I think the Monster is well-supported enough in this set that it is probably worth a first pick in some weaker packs.

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Swarming Goblins

AI Rating: 2.4
Pro Rating: 3.0

This seems like a pretty nice 5-drop. The worst case is 5 mana for a 4/3 and a 1/1, and that’s a pretty passable card -- if you get two tokens out of this it is going to feel well worth the investment, and obviously on the rare occasions you hit 20 you’ll feel like you’re robbing the bank.

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Tiger-Tribe Hunter

AI Rating: 2.9
Pro Rating: 3.0

This doesn’t have the most impressive stats around, but since it is a 4/4 with Pack Tactics, it doesn’t need a whole lot of help to trigger it, and when you do, it will feel pretty good -- flinging something at one of your opponent’s creatures can be a pretty good ability, though it isn’t the kind that you’ll always be able to make use of. It is especially nice that he doesn’t have to stick to only Flinging the creatures who are attacking, so you can play a new creature and use it to kill off an opposing blocker, suddenly making your attack a real problem for your opponent. Sacrificing a creature is a real cost to be sure, but when that ability does its thing, it is going to feel pretty great. The base line here is a little bit rough, and the baility won’t always work out, but I thinkt his does enough to be a pretty high quality playable.

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Unexpected Windfall

AI Rating: 1
Pro Rating: 2.0

This seems like a decent card for Most red decks to get one copy of. 4 mana is a lot for Tormenting Voice, but the two Treasure you get means this card also gives you some very real fixing, in addition to helping you dig deeper into your deck.

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Valor Singer

AI Rating: 2.4
Pro Rating: 3.0

This type of effect tends to be a bit better than it looks. I mean, on his own he is effectively a 3-mana 3/3 in most cases, and you’ll often have other creatures on which you can use the ability that might have more of an impact. At the very least, this seems like a solid playable.

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Wish

AI Rating: 2
Pro Rating: 0.0

These type of effects usually aren’t that good in Limited. You have to have something worth grabbing in your sideboard, but this isn’t Strixhaven, you’re not going to have a bunch of good options in there. Mostly, this will cost three mana to grab some mediocre card out of your sideboard. One kind of interesting thing here is that if you draft basic lands, you can sort of use it as fixing, but it isn’t exactly good at that either. I think this is probably just unplayable.

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Xorn

AI Rating: 4.5
Pro Rating: 3.0

This has passable stats, and its ability to multiply treasure will definitely come up sometimes, especially in the Black Red deck. However, I wouldn’t count on that always coming up.

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You Come to the Gnoll Camp

AI Rating: 0.5
Pro Rating: 2.0

Like most of this cycle, this has two effects that are good in the right situation, but pretty narrow. Putting them together does make for a better card, and sometimes aggro decks really want a card that just blanks a couple of blockers – and they also are pretty happy with a combat trick, even if this one isn’t the greatest. The lack of significant toughness boost makes it a challenge for this to help your creature survive combats, but that’s alright. The first copy of this seems like a decent inclusion for Red aggro decks.

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You Find Some Prisoners

AI Rating: 2
Pro Rating: 2.0

I think this is a bit underwhelming compared to the other Uncommon “Choose your Adventure”-style cards. If you can hit an Artifact with it that will be nice, but the second ability is a little too random, though it will certainly be useful most of the time in the later game, as it effectively draws you a card. Still, You Find some Prisoners is likely to sit in your hand for a long time before it actually does something, and even when it does do something, it normally isn’t going to feel that powerful.

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You See a Pair of Goblins

AI Rating: 2.8
Pro Rating: 3.0

This is a pretty nice modal card. If you’re not going wide enough, make a couple of Goblins at Instant speed. If you are going wide enough, this is basically trumpet blast. Neither of those cards are amazing, but jamming them both on to the same card is good, and really helps make a go-wide deck viable.

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Zalto, Fire Giant Duke

AI Rating: 4.4
Pro Rating: 3.5

A 5-mana 7/3 with Trample is probably something you’d play more often than not, especially in a set with lots of Pack Tactics, since he can trigger it all on his own, but what really makes Zalto powerful is the fact that in most cases your opponent will have to at least give you the value of Venturing into the Dungeon once. There’s a chance they kill him in a way that doesn’t do damage, but it is far more likely that they have to damage him somehow, either with a damaging removal spell or a block. A block is preferable, since if he can take down a 3/3 and venture for you while trampling over for 4, you’ll feel pretty good about the situation.

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Zariel, Archduke of Avernus

AI Rating: 5
Pro Rating: 4.5

This is a really strong planeswalker at 4 mana. Importantly, he can protect himself a little bit with those Devil tokens. Devil tokens are some of the most obnoxious ones around, and they can really make it difficult for an opponent to attack you, as they can enable 2-for-1s more often than you might think. His other two abilities are less impressive, but his +1 can help you do a ton of damage fast, and his ultimate -- while somewhat dependent on you having a board state -- can definitely win you the game. I think Zariel probably does enough to get into the lower range of “bomb” status.

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Bulette

AI Rating: 1.2
Pro Rating: 2.5

We’ve seen a lot of creatures like this in the past, and they’re not usually anything amazing, though their ability to grow throughout the game is nice, and they do eventually become a problem for your opponent. Because it counts the death of any creature, you will find that this gains that counter a decent chunk of the time.

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Bull's Strength

AI Rating: 0.8
Pro Rating: 1.5

Like most versions of this that we’ve seen, it is pretty reasonable. The boost it gives will allow you to win combat, and trample will even allow you to do some damage out of nowhere. The untap clause also gives a creature pseudo vigilance, or allows you to ambush an opposing creature, though like with most tricks, you generally prefer to use it offensively -- but the additional flexibility doesn’t hurt. It is still a trick though and comes with all those inherent risks I always talk about -- its situational, and if things go wrong you get blown out really hard.

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Choose Your Weapon

AI Rating: 1.9
Pro Rating: 2.5

Both options here are super underwhelming, and will only be useful and efficient in some very specific situations. But, like with all of these cards, putting two situational effects together really does make for a significantly better card, as the situations where you can use that card are drastically increased, even with a card that has two incredibly situational options. Sometimes you’ll find yourself doing lethal with “Two-Weapon Fighting” and sometimes you’ll find yourself killing an opposing Flyer fairly efficiently. I think that makes this a solid card.

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Circle of Dreams Druid

AI Rating: 3.1
Pro Rating: 2.5

The mana requirement here is steep, and you should really never expect to actually play it on turn three, but with the kind of mana it can produce, playing it later won’t be too shabby either, though you do probably need some mana sinks to find use for the mana. If you ended up with two of these, it would be tempting to go mono-green for sure, provided you have those payoffs, but most of the time it won’t go that way.

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Circle of the Moon Druid

AI Rating: 1.4
Pro Rating: 2.5

A card that is always a 3-mana 4/2 is like a 2.0 and a card that is always a 3-mana 2/4 is a 1.0. This gives you the best of both of those, as you’d rather have the 4/2 as the attacker and the 2/4 as the blocker most of the time.

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Compelled Duel

AI Rating: 0.4
Pro Rating: 1.0

I’m never a huge fan of this type of card. It isn’t easy to get 2-for-1’d when you cast it, and it is fairly situational. However, this is cheaper than most versions of this we’ve seen. +3/+3 is going to be enough to make just about any creature into a problem, though keep in mind that your opponent only needs to use one blocker here – it isn’t that all creatures have to block – just one does. So you need to end up in situations where the 3 damage either wins you the game or you take down an important creature, but a lot of the time their important creature will be attacking you.

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Dire Wolf Prowler

AI Rating: 1
Pro Rating: 1.5

This starts off with very mediocre stats. A Gray Ogre is just abysmal, and while it has a decent activated ability that can make it a 4/4 with Haste, I don’t think this does enough to be saved from being a card you cut significantly more often than you play it.

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Druid Class

AI Rating: 2.7
Pro Rating: 2.0

I’m not very impressed with this. Gaining a life for every land isn’t worth a card, and while this does level up, neither of the things it levels up into are that good. Playing more than one land a turn is pretty hard to take advantage of after the very early game, because you just won’t have extra lands, and if you do -- you’re probably flooding! Level three is where you finally get something that is worth a whole card in Limited, but you paid a total of 10 mana to get there, and the final product is just a big vanilla creature. Yes, the fact you pay installments does matter, but overall, I think you’ll end up cutting Druid Class a significant chunk of the time.

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Ellywick Tumblestrum

AI Rating: 4.9
Pro Rating: 4.0

Her main strength is her ability to allow you to pretty rapidly go through a dungeon, which will give you a lot of value and allow you to make your cards better that check to see if you’ve completed them. Her -2 isn’t bad either, as it does let you dig for a creature and you’ll sometimes even gain life! Her ultimate is nice -- and synergizes well with the +1, as she is very likely to tick up and help you complete a dungeon, and if she is left unchecked, that ultimate will give a pretty nice boost. Now, there are some very real downsides here -- she does nothing to protect herself, and she has to tick down to draw you cards. There will be times where you just can’t play Ellywick effectively because your board state needs to already be pretty well constructed for her to get going. I think that keeps her from bomb status, though she is still quite good.

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Elturgard Ranger

AI Rating: 1.6
Pro Rating: 3.0

So, for 5 mana you get a 4/1 and a 2/2 -- in other words 6/3 worth of stats. A 5-mana 6/3 wouldn’t be good, but spread across two bodies this gets pretty interesting, plus a 4/1 with Reach has the kind of size to take down some of the dragons in the set, and that definitely matters. It feels like you’ll be able to get a 2-for-1 out of this a decent chunk of the time, and I think most Green decks will be interested in playing the first copy.

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Find the Path

AI Rating: 1.2
Pro Rating: 2.5

I think you’re getting pretty solid value here, between getting some ramp and venturing into a dungeon. Venture won’t always feel like drawing a card, but later on in the dungeons it will give you that kind of value, and even the early rooms in the dungeons seem decent enough.

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Froghemoth

AI Rating: 4.7
Pro Rating: 4.0

So, if you can just play this and bash for 4 with it -- which is possible thanks to Haste -- you’re going to feel pretty great about the situation, as it is likely it gets at least one counter and gains you some life, and things will sort of snowball from there, although your opponent does have to have cards to exile for him to do his thing. Even if you don’t end up with that ideal situation, you have a sizable creature with Trample that your opponent has to account for, and while sometimes it just won’t be able to attack, it will pretty much always be something of a threat to them

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Gnoll Hunter

AI Rating: 2.8
Pro Rating: 3.0

This is a fine two drop. It is a bear as a baseline, and it can get bigger if it has enough friends. That’s good enough upside for this to be a nice two-drop for Green decks.

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Green Dragon

AI Rating: 2.6
Pro Rating: 3.5

This whole cycle is pretty nice, and Green Dragon doesn’t really disappoint. A 6-mana 4/4 Flyer is often a borderline playable, but its ETB trigger is also going to be a huge headache for people to contend with. Now, there will be some board states where it doesn’t do much, but the card has a reasonable base line and will sometimes set up situations where your opponent just has to block to not die, which means they lose their creatures.

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Hill Giant Herdgorger

AI Rating: 1.8
Pro Rating: 2.5

This seems like a fine finisher for Green decks. You’re probably going to hope you have a rare or Uncommon in that slot, but this card is similar enough to Ravenous Lindwurm and Honey Mammoth to make me feel like it has a nice shot. I have a feeling it might not be quite as good as those cards, because this format looks like it is probably going to be faster than Kaldheim, but it looks pretty solid to me

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Hunter's Mark

AI Rating: 3.6
Pro Rating: 3.5

Even without the upside against Blue decks, Hunter’s Mark would be a very good removal spell for Green. Instant speed punch is great, especially when it comes with the additional upside of sometimes only costing a single mana! This is premium removal.

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Inspiring Bard

AI Rating: 1
Pro Rating: 2.5

A creature with just the Bardic Inspiration ability is usually a solid playable, but it does come with the downside of not doing anything with a +2/+2 boost doesn’t matter -- like if you have to play defense, or don’t have another creature. Adding the “Song of Rest” option means that in those situations, you could an ability that is far more useful, and that’s pretty nice. It probably still isn’t more than a solid playable, though.

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Instrument of the Bards

AI Rating: 2.6
Pro Rating: 0.0

This card seems a little hard to make work in Limited. For one thing, in the early game you won’t really be interested in using it, as adding to your board more immediately will be far better than just tutoring something up. That means that playing this on turn one isn’t going to feel that great, as it will just sit around unused. I guess if you can’t do anything early it will probably be an okay thing to have around, but you’re still going to be in a lot of trouble, even with this, if you aren’t able to add to your board at all on turns 2-4. It does get a little bit interesting in the later part of the game, like using it to find your 6 mana finisher or something. But even then, it is a very slow cards. So what you’re looking at here is still a very particular tutor, and one that you don’t actually have that much control over. The mana cost HAS to be equal to what you search up, not “less than or equal.” I think in the end this is probably just unplayable, it is far too particular to make work in Limited.

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Intrepid Outlander

AI Rating: 3.5
Pro Rating: 3.5

This starts out with nice base stats. Reach tends to perform pretty well in Limited, especially in colors that don’t have that much access to Green, and obviously the Pack Tactics trigger here is quite powerful. Venturing into Dungeons is going to be the source of a ton of value in this format, and Intrepid Outlander can help you do it sometimes

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Loathsome Troll

AI Rating: 2.5
Pro Rating: 2.5

A 5-mana 6/2 is not very good, though it does make Pack Tactics get going all on its own, and that certainly is relevant int his format. Still, a 2-drop can block it and take it down! The good news is, if you have the time and the mana, it has a solid ability it can use from the graveyard. It going on top of your library is not super good, since you have to replace your draw to get it back, and there’s a reasonable chance what you were going to draw was going to be better, but when it returns to your hand it will feel pretty good, and obviously that’s true when it goes to the battlefield as well. Still, this doesn’t have the best stats ever, even accounting for Pack Tactics, and its ability is both expensive and going to feel actively mediocre when you roll a 1-9

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Long Rest

AI Rating: 3.1
Pro Rating: 2.0

This is pretty bad for most of the game, since you need a bunch of mana and the right mix of mana values in your graveyard for it to do something. However, it does seem like a pretty nice card in the late game, paying 6 and getting three things back with it isn’t a crazy thing to expect. Of course, it is a Sorcery, and you don’t often have time to use up all your mana on a turn and not add to the board at all, so that really balances things. However, if you make it to your next turn, you’ll be in pretty good position

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Lurking Roper

AI Rating: 2.6
Pro Rating: 3.5

You would basically always end up playing a 3-mana ⅘ Wall. That might sound crazy to you, but the main reason Walls tend to not be great in Limited is because most of them can just block things and not damage them. The Roper isn’t just a wall, it is one that will kill almost everything that can attack into it in the early and mid-game. So, even if that’s all this was, I think the first copy would make the cut in most Green decks. So, when you add the bonus that it can attack, you’ve got a better card, and then you have a way to actually untap it too, and it is even better! Even if you can never untap the thing, it is going to be a pretty nice card, and if you can, it will be awesome

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Neverwinter Dryad

AI Rating: 0.8
Pro Rating: 2.5

This is a fine one drop. It ramps for you, and that looks to be a good strategy in this format, especially in UG. It is nice that if you play it early it might actually attack for a bit too

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Ochre Jelly

AI Rating: 4.5
Pro Rating: 4.5

Creatures that scale like this can be nice in Limited, because you can play them early if you really need a body, and in the late game it can be absolutely massive, something that pairs well with Trample. I mean, if you play it on turn three, it is a 3-mana 2/2 that leaves behind a 1/1, and that’s a card you would play a decent chunk of the time -- and as I said, it scales all game long, leaving behind more and more formidable tokens that will then also leave behind other tokens if they have enough counters. The mana investment is big, but this will usually give you more than enough. I think this is in the lower part of “bomb” tier. It can be huge, has an evasive ability, will give you something even if it dies right away in most cases, and has a decent baseline.

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Old Gnawbone

AI Rating: 4.9
Pro Rating: 3.5

A 7-mana 7/7 Flyer is certainly imposing, but it better be for that cost! One nice thing here is that you will be able to get Treasure out of this the turn you play it, so even if your opponent kills it on their turn, you at least get something. Of course, the problem here is that you probably don’t really need treasure if you were able to cast Old Gnarlbone, and while this format does seem to have a significant number of mana sinks, I’m just not sure you’ll have anything to do with all the treasure this produces.

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Owlbear

AI Rating: 3.3
Pro Rating: 3.5

This is reminiscent of Sarulf’s Packmate, and that’s a good Green Common to emulate. This gives you a very real body -- a 4/4 with Trample can be relevant on many board states, but obviously the ETB draw a card effect is what really makes this great. It will be virtually impossible for you not to get a 2-for-1 out of this Bear, and the value it gives you will be great. Sure, costing 5 does mean you can only run so many, unlike the Packmate which had Foretell, making it much easier to jam a bunch of them into your deck, but you should still value that first 1-2 copies pretty highly. There’s a good chance this is Green’s best common

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Plummet

AI Rating: 0.4
Pro Rating: 0.5

This is a weird card to see these days, since “sideboard” type cards are becoming less and less of a thing in Limited. Instead, they give us modal cards that do sideboard-type things, but have much better fail case than sideboard cards. Anyway, this is something you should pretty much never main deck, but not too terrible if you go up against an opponent with enough targets.

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Prosperous Innkeeper

AI Rating: 3.2
Pro Rating: 3.0

A two mana 1/1 that gives you treasure is already pretty decent. It gives you some real fixing and ramp, so adding the life gain effect to the Innkeeper makes for a pretty nice two drop for most green decks

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Purple Worm

AI Rating: 3.4
Pro Rating: 3.5

Even if you always paid 7 for this, it would be kind of alright, and it will frequently just be 5 mana. Adding Ward to a card like this really matters too, because the big downside with this kind of creature is that your opponent might be able to kill it for very little mana. Now, there’s still a pretty good chance they can kill it for less than 7, but killing it for less than 5 won’t be a common occurrence! This seems like a nice finisher for Green decks

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Ranger Class

AI Rating: 4.9
Pro Rating: 5.0

This looks quite good. First of all, it adds to the board right away, unlike other classes -- and that makes the baseline here a two mana 2/2. Then, it starts putting a counter on an attacking creature at level two, and level three can generate serious card advantage. The whole package is amazing, and reasonably costed each step of the way. This kind of gives me Sparring Regimen vibes, between the +1/+1 counter effect and all the extra value. This is a bomb

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Ranger's Longbow

AI Rating: 0.3
Pro Rating: 1.5

This gives a reasonable boost and key word for the cost, though it isn’t anything special.

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Scaled Herbalist

AI Rating: 0.2
Pro Rating: 2.0

When you get this down early, it will feel pretty nice. It doesn’t have the best stats, but you are likely to have the extra lands necessary to take advantage of its ability. In the mid-to-late-game it becomes increasingly useless though, unless you’re able to draw a whole bunch of cards

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Spoils of the Hunt

AI Rating: 2.7
Pro Rating: 3.5

So even without any treasure at all, this is a 3-mana Rabid Bite at Instant speed, which is already a card I would be interested in. It also compares pretty well with Ambuscade, a card that cost the same and always gave +1/+0 in addition to the punch effect. The treasure upside is nice, because sometimes your creature won’t have the power necessary to be good with Spoils of the Hunt. However, if you’re in Green anyway, your creatures will mostly be good with this. One does have to be cautious with spells like this, as your opponent removing the creature you target is an epic blow out, but because its an Instant, it won’t be that hard to find an ideal window. I think this is premium removal

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Sylvan Shepherd

AI Rating: 1.4
Pro Rating: 2.5

This looks like it has a lot going on because of the d20 stuff, but it is basically just a 3-mana ⅔ with Vigilance that gains you 1-2 life when it attacks. That’s basically a textbook solid playable, especially in a format that does have some life gain payoffs

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The Tarrasque

AI Rating: 4.7
Pro Rating: 1.0 // 4.5

This needs a build around grade. If you can build a good enough ramp deck, this is an insane win condition. Ward 10 is basically hexbroof, and Haste + fighting every time it attacks will quickly decimate your opponent. But 9 mana is a lot, and it will just be unobtainable in most Limited decks. However, it does look like UG can probably achieve it in this format if the draft goes really well, and this will be awesome there

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Underdark Basilisk

AI Rating: 2.1
Pro Rating: 2.5

It is pretty hard for small creatures with Deathtouch not to be playable, since they bring the capability of trading with anything. This makes them relevant all game long, though never super impressive. They also tend to be good with fight and punch spells

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Varis, Silverymoon Ranger

AI Rating: 4.9
Pro Rating: 4.5

This is a 3-mana 3/3 with Reach that not only makes it very easy for you to trigger your Dungeon Rooms, but also churns out Wolf tokens as you do. That’s excellent. And hey, Ward 1 might not be the most exciting Ward ever, but it does make him slightly harder to kill, so I’ll take it. He does enough to get into the lower tier of the bombs in this set

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Wandering Troubadour

AI Rating: 3.7
Pro Rating: 4.0

While this isn’t quite Landfall - Venture into a dungeon, it is a close approximation of that, and that seems pretty awesome. You have to wait to venture until the end of your turn, so if your opponent can kill the Bard after you play the land you won’t get to Venture, so keep that in mind when you play with and against this, but the fact that this can venture for you if you’re hitting land drops is pretty awesome. A 4-mana 4/2 isnt’ exactly a world beater, but it is the kind of stat-line that does trade pretty well with bigger creatures, so that’s nice too. I think this is going to be something you take pretty highly

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Werewolf Pack Leader

AI Rating: 4.6
Pro Rating: 4.0

This is a very good card. If you can play it on turn two, it gives you some nice size in the early game, but it maintains very real relevance into the late game thanks to its ability to draw you card AND to turn into a full-on wereowlf. When it does that, it also gives you 5 of the 6 power necessary to trigger Pack Tactics, which is a great added bonus. Even just drawing with this once and forcing a trade seems good, and sometimes it will run away with the game

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Wild Shape

AI Rating: 1.1
Pro Rating: 2.0

I’m not usually a big fan of tricks that grant hexproof, they are just too situational! But this gets around that with some pretty nice modality. You can still get Hexproof if you need it, but it has two other modes that can be useful in different situations, and having an option between those three things is pretty nice, though not incredibly. A 1/5 with Reach is probably just going to enable a block you didn’t have before, which isn’t a great thing to give up a card for most of the time, and making something into a 3/3 with Trample won’t always matter either. So, the 1/3 option is probably the best one. Still, for only one mana this does a kind of okay job, and it is certainly decent

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You Find a Cursed Idol

AI Rating: 1.1
Pro Rating: 2.0

This seems like a solid card to me. The modality here is great, and most of the time if you can blow up an Artifact or Enchantment, that’s where you’re going to go, but it is great that it has a fail case of Venture + Treasure, which won’t always feel like a whol card’s worth of value, but it gets pretty close. This is sort of like a Naturalize with Cycling in that sense, and that’s always a decent card

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You Happen On a Glade

AI Rating: 2.7
Pro Rating: 3.0

I like this. It gives Green decks some really good fixing -- and that’s the option that will feel worthwhile the most often. However, one eventually reaches a stage in a game where top decking a fixing spell like this isn’t what you want to be doing, and by that stage of the game you probably have something in your graveyard yo’ud love to get back. I don’t really see myself cutting the first copy of this in most Green decks, especially if I’m splashing or 3 colors

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You Meet in a Tavern

AI Rating: 2.6
Pro Rating: 3.0

Both options on this can be quite powerful. Sometimes you really need to find yourself a couple of creatures in the top part of your deck, and other times pumping the whole board is great. This is a rather clunky Sorcery, but both modes can be great in the right situation

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Adult Gold Dragon

AI Rating: 4.7
Pro Rating: 4.0

This has a bunch of key words and good stats. Flying, Lifelink, and Haste combine quite well, as they can help you to quickly put the game out of reach for your opponent. The Dragon will often be able to hit your opponent at least once, even if they have removal, and any more than that and you’re talking about a massive gap in life totals in your favor. The one disadvantage the Gold Dragon has is that 3 toughness can die to a whole lot of things, but I still think the combination here is quite nice, though probably not quite a bomb. While it doesn’t definitely give you value even if it dies, Haste + Lifelink + Flying does a good job of giving it a pretty good chance to do that

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Bard Class

AI Rating: 2
Pro Rating: 1.0

This set does have a significant number of legendaries in it, but I’m not convinced there will be enough to really make this worthwhile. It is all about legendaries, and does literal nothing if you don’t have enough of them. I could give it a build around grade, but I think it will be so difficult to make this work that I don’t think I need to go there

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Barrowin of Clan Undurr

AI Rating: 3.1
Pro Rating: 3.5

The ETB trigger here is nice on a 4-mana 3/3, but the real value comes from whether or not you have completed a dungeon, as Barrowin offers you an excellent attack trigger, one that will make it pretty easy for you to get some amazing value out of this card, especially because it Ventured! BW looks pretty good at completing Dungeons too, so I imagine this is in the lower range of first pickable

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Bruenor Battlehammer

AI Rating: 3.6
Pro Rating: 3.5

RW has often been about Equipment lately, and that’s what we’re seeing here too. And, because this guy has a semi-reasonable floor as a 4-mana 5/3, you’ll be playing him even if you only have one piece of Equipment for him to take advantage of. And, once you do have Equipment, his two Equipment bonuses are pretty incredible. Equip cost of 0 on the first Equip each turn AND an additional stats boost for Equipment is just awesome. He takes some building around to be sure, but if you’re in RW you’re going to do a decent job getting equipment without even trying that hard.

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Drizzt Do'Urden

AI Rating: 4.7
Pro Rating: 5.0

So, a 5-mana 3/3 with Double Strike is almost passable, and this does a heck of a lot more than that! You pay 5-mana for 8/4 worth of stats across two bodies with very real key word abilities. And that would probably be enough for this to be a really good card but then you add the fact that Drizzt gets bigger when creatures with higher power die, and you’re talking about a bomb. Especially because that 4/1 dying will make Drizzt into a 4/4, so there is built in synergy, you don’t have to go hard on really making Drizzt good -- it just will be

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Farideh, Devil's Chosen

AI Rating: 2.6
Pro Rating: 3.5

I never thought I’d say this -- but there are enough cards that let you roll a d20 in this set for Farideh to be quite impressive. Flying and Menace usually just means “umblockable,” and you’ll also draw a card about half the time which is just silly. There probably aren’t quite so many d20 cards in this set for Farideh to be super easy to really abuse, but it seems like there’s enough for it to do pretty good

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Fighter Class

AI Rating: 3.2
Pro Rating: 1.0 // 3.5

So, if you have some Equipment this does a nice job of tutoring it up off the bat, which isn’t too bad, especially if you have some of the higher rarity Equipment. The tutor effect alone wouldn’t really be enough for Limited, but leveling it up makes your Equipment a lot better. Level 3 is honestly kind of disappointing power level wise.. This is definitely a build around. Your average RW deck will have some Equipment in to be sure, that’s part of the color pairs theme, but if you just have like 3, and they are all just kind of average, this won’t be great. If you end up with enough good Equipment though, this can be pretty incredible

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Gretchen Titchwillow

AI Rating: 2.3
Pro Rating: 3.5

That stat-line is a passable one for a defensive creature that does something else, and Gretchen definitely does, supplying you with a very powerful mana sink ability that will be a life saver in the late game. The extra land part of the card won’t always matter, since most of the time when you start using this ability you’re probably not going to be in desperate need of more lands, but it could definitely help, especially in UG, which is a ramp color pair as it often is.

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Hama Pashar, Ruin Seeker

AI Rating: 2.6
Pro Rating: 3.5

UW is all about Dungeons, especially triggering them with ETB abilities, and getting two triggers out of dungeon rooms is pretty powerful. Hama is definitely small for the cost, but I don’t see it being very difficult to get a ton of value out of her

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Kalain, Reclusive Painter

AI Rating: 3.6
Pro Rating: 4.0

A two mana ½ that makes a treasure is already a pretty good deal, but this adds all kinds of upside that will be amazing in the BR deck. Even all on its own, it is pretty likely that the treasure you made will help you play a creature and put a +1/+1 counter on it your next turn, and that’s some serious value. If you manage to really get treasure going with Kalain, she will undoubtedly take over games. She is certainly fragile, but the fail case is that you still get to keep a single treasure, and that helps make that a little less of a problem. This is a really strong signpost Uncommon

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Krydle of Baldur's Gate

AI Rating: 3.2
Pro Rating: 4.0

This seems like a really great signpost Uncommon. UB seems to be about doing combat damage to an opponent and getting triggers out of it, and Krydle definitely showcases how great that can be. His combat damage trigger is pretty awesome -- it allows him to do 2 damage at a time, while gaining you life and allowing you to improve your draws. Even if he couldn’t make himself and OTHER creatures unblockable, Krydle would be really good -- but he CAN do that, and in the late game he can just produce lethal damage out of nowhere

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Minsc, Beloved Ranger

AI Rating: 4.6
Pro Rating: 3.5

There are treasures and other forms of fixing in this format, so casting Minsc isn’t super difficult, though it isn’t a walk in the park either. And, if you can,, you get a 3/3 and a 1/1, and the ability to turn creatures huge, including your Hamster buddy! The casting cost definitely holds him back, but he looks pretty good overall

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Monk Class

AI Rating: 3.5
Pro Rating: 4.0

Level 1 of this class isn’t anything amazing, but it might help you double spell sometimes. Level two lets you bounce something, and that’s something that I think really elevates this class – its ability to actually interact with the opposing board! That will buy you more time to try to get Level 3 here, which you’ll want to do, because it will effectively start drawing you cards if you can double spell. Now, you won’t always be able to do it, but this is actually really cheap to level up, and just drawing a couple cards off of it will make you feel pretty good about your situation

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Orcus, Prince of Undeath

AI Rating: 4.7
Pro Rating: 5.0

So, at worst, this is a 4-mana 5/3 with Flying and Trample. That’s already a B, because it is a cheap creature that puts your opponent on a very fast clock. So, the option of pumping extra mana into him for additional effects is upside on an already impressive card. If you pay 7 and kill all the X/2s on the board, or get back like a two-drop to the battlefield that’s going to feel pretty great. It just seems like, at worst, you have a creature that pressures your opponent in the sky really effectively, and at best you have a card that completely reshapes the board in your favor. And yes, the -X/-X part is symmetrical, but because you have complete control over it, you’ll only use that part when it is beneficial for you, making it feel a lot less symmetrical. I think this does enough to be a bomb

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Rogue Class

AI Rating: 4.3
Pro Rating: 2.5

The first level of this is pretty terrible. It effectively mills a card when your creatures hit your opponent, and gives you a bit of information. Level two, giving your whole board menace, is pretty nice, and can be a pretty big problem on a lot of board states, but level three is where the real value can be found here, as getting to cast cards you exiled with Rogue Class is going to be quite powerful. The total mana investment is obviously huge, but paying it in installments softens the blow significantly. The card does ask you to have a pretty significant board presence to make it do its thing, and that’s definitely a big limitation

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Shessra, Death's Whisper

AI Rating: 2
Pro Rating: 3.0

This is a pretty sweet card. The idea is, you play her and force an opposing creature to block one of your creatures, ideally, killing that creature and keeping yours alive. Then, at the end of the turn you can pay 2 life to draw a card if that happened. Obviously, it doesn’t have to line up perfectly for her to draw you cards and stuff -- it can happen on any turn, but what I described is sort of the ideal scenario. The problem I see, though, is that the ETB trigger won’t matter a decent chunk of the time, so setting up that first draw is definitely not a foregone conclusion. She also has really bad stats for the cost. Still, in most games she’s likely to draw you a few cards, but I can’t help but think she’s a bit more underwhelming than the other signpost legendaries

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Skeletal Swarming

AI Rating: 4.6
Pro Rating: 4.0

This seems quite good. This set has a decent number of skeletons in it, even without this card, but this is pretty powerful all on its own, since it churns out Skeleton tokens for you.. One really nice thing about it is that you can tap out to play this on turn five and you still get to add to your board, since you’ll be getting at least one 1/1 Skeleton out of the deal. Its tapped, so it can’t block, but it is still nice to get something right away. Then, once you have enough skeletons, they are going to be very capable of taking your opponent down thanks to Trample and the big stats boost. One really nice thing about this card is it will give you two Skeletons whether or not the creature that died during your turn is a token. This means you can have a sacrifice outlet that gobbles up one skeleton every turn and then still net skeletons each turn. There are a few sacrifice outlets in this set, including at Common, so that’s not a pipe dream! It isn’t quite a bomb, mostly because the Skeletons have to attack every turn, so you can’t really bide your time and attack for a ton of damage. But its still really good!

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Sorcerer Class

AI Rating: 2
Pro Rating: 3.0

Getting Faithless looting for a Blue and a Red is a nice place to start here, as it will really help you find cards you want. Once you take this to level 2, things start to get more interesting, as you’re given a whole bunch of mana, and you can even use that mana to level it up to level three! Sadly, level three won’t be very impressive in Limited, as casting more than like two Instants and Sorceries consistently is a pipe dream, even in the most spell-heavy decks. Mostly, this is about Level 1 and 2 in Limited, and that seems like a fine card for most Blue-Red decks in this format. It might take a little bit of building around, but UR always has lots of spells, so I don’t see that being a big hurdle, especially because Level 1 is kind of alright all on its own

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Targ Nar, Demon-Fang Gnoll

AI Rating: 2.6
Pro Rating: 3.0

This is the signpost uncommon for RG, a color pair that is all about Pack Tactics. Targ comes with its own Pack Tactics ability, and its one that is pretty nice, though not incredible. However, because he has the ability to double his own power, he can make Pack Tactics happen pretty easily, and him attacking with just a couple of other creatures can be a real problem. Still, right now at least, I think that this signpost Uncommon falls a little bit short of being one you want to take with a super early pick. It doesn’t seem like the kind of card that will take over games often enough.

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Tiamat

AI Rating: 3.8
Pro Rating: 3.5

The cost here is pretty rough, being WUBRG and all that -- but it is a 7-mana 7/7 that will usually be able to draw you at least one card -- and that card will be another Dragon. The mana cost definitely holds it back, but if you end up with a good mana base that can actually make this happen, obviously enough, Tiamat will feel like a bomb. This is probably going to be the most doable in RB, because you have access to the most treasure in that color pair. However, thanks to that mana cost, you really can’t be valuing this the same way you could a mono-colored or two-colored bomb

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Trelasarra, Moon Dancer

AI Rating: 2.9
Pro Rating: 3.5

This is a very powerful life gain payoff for the GW deck. If you’ve ever played with Ajani’s Pridemate, you know what I’m talking about! And this trigger is even better than that one! Adding Scry can help you find more ways to gain life too, to keep the party going. This is going to be a high pick, even as a multi-colored card

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Triumphant Adventurer

AI Rating: 4.2
Pro Rating: 3.5

This guy is definitely small, but the combination of death touch + First Strike when it attacks is going to be pretty great, especially because he ventures for you every single time it attacks, and that will get you through a dungeon in a hurry. Even if your opponent does take it down in combat, they will have to give up at least one thing, and sometimes your opponent will be able to double block and kill it, but you’re still getting a good deal. Backing it up with combat tricks will be nasty too, because obviously First Strike + Death Touch + 2 or more power means you can take down both blockers and keep the Adventurer alive. He does die to pretty much everything, but his ability to venture repeatedly is too good to pass up

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Volo, Guide to Monsters

AI Rating: 4.5
Pro Rating: 3.5

This might look like it is hard to make work because of the requirements, but I think it will be relatively easy to trigger this at least once. There are a plethora of creature types in this format, and while you will ideally have a good mix of them to make Volo work, you probably don’t have to work that hard to do it. You really only need to get one copy out of it for it to feel like you’re getting there, and anything more than that will probably be enough to put you comfortably in the lead.

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Xanathar, Guild Kingpin

AI Rating: 4.9
Pro Rating: 5.0

Obviously enough, this is a bomb. Shutting off the opponent’s spells during your turn isn’t an incredible effect in Limited, though it does matter. Xanathar’s power really comes from the ability to just play cards from your opponent’s library, though. Note it says “play” which means it includes lands, so if there is a land on top, you can play it with your land drop for the turn and hopefully hit something better. That just means you’ll get serious value out of this guy virtually every single turn. It does have unimpressive stats and you have to wait until your next upkeep to get the value, but still -- this is an amazing bomb

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Bag of Holding

AI Rating: 1.6
Pro Rating: 2.5

This was a predictable reprint, given the theme of this set. Last time we saw it, it was a Rare, and it was a pretty decent card. Having a card that just lets you sink mana into it to loot is itself a nice thing to have around, and the fact that you can actually eventually get the stuff back that you put on the Bag is nice upside, though it won’t come up that often. It still doesn’t have a real board presence, so it isn’t nearly as good as a creature who can loot for you

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The Deck of Many Things

AI Rating: 4.8
Pro Rating: 4.0

Like most of the d20 cards, this thing is pretty wacky! Also funny to see like..cards, on a Magic card itself. But anyway, this has a repeatable effect that will often be quite good at grinding out a win. You will typically draw two cards with it or return something from your graveyard, and doing that every turn is pretty potent.. And while yeah, if you have too many cards it will be harder to draw more, by the time of the game where a card like this tends to be good, you’re probably not going ot have a hard time keeping your hand small enough to still draw those 2 cards most of the time. It is definitely a slow card, but will be good enough in the later part of the game to consider taking highly

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Dungeon Map

AI Rating: 2.8
Pro Rating: 3.0

This provides a bit of ramp, and then in the later part of the game it is a great place to sink your mana, as venturing over and over again is some nice value. If this format is super fast, playing this on turn three could end up being a pretty big liability, and the late game value won’t matter, but if this is a typical format, I can see this being a pretty nice card in just about any deck

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Eye of Vecna

AI Rating: 4.2
Pro Rating: 3.0

This costs a fair bit of life, but drawing cards is always really nice in Limited, as signifcantly outcarding your opponent usually leads to victory. The fact it draws you a card right away is nice, and then – if you have the life, time, and mana – you can use it to draw more cards later. This might be the most well-positioned in the GW deck, which has the most life gain in the format, but I think it will be pretty good in any deck

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Fifty Feet of Rope

AI Rating: 1.5
Pro Rating: 2.0

Well, this is interesting. “Climb Over” won’t matter very often, and “Tie Up” is perhaps a little too situational too. Because it doesn’t tap the creature as part of the effect, it will only do a thing against creatures that already tapped. The part that intrigues me the most is Venturing into the Dungeon, but even that seems a little clunky, though it is obviously a late game mana sink. The first two modes will be hard to make use of early or even late, and the Venture into the Dungeon option is pretty good late, but I can see this sitting ont he table doing very little early, and that’s kind of rough. This is definitely the kind of card it is easy to miss on, because it is both unusual and utilizes a new mechanic, but I don’t think I’m super high on it right now

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Greataxe

AI Rating: 0.2
Pro Rating: 1.0

+4/+0 is the kind of boost that makes almost any creature capable of attacking, but an Equip Cost of 5 is way too much. This is equipment that might be nice in the later part of the game, since you can just keep sending your guys in, but it will sit on the table doing nothing the rest of the game

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Hand of Vecna

AI Rating: 4.6
Pro Rating: 3.5

This looks pretty good. Sure, you need to have cards in your hand for it to pump your creature, but you’ll basically always have at least one card in your hand, so it will give +1/+1 most of the time, at least on your turn. And that also means it will be very cheap to Equip, sometimes you’ll be able to equip it for 0 life! The flip side is that if your hand is loaded with cards, it will make your creature huge, but probably be better to pay the normal Equip cost instead of the life one. Either way, you end up with an Equipment that is reasonably efficient, and does good stuff pretty much all game long

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Iron Golem

AI Rating: 1.8
Pro Rating: 2.5

This is like Juggernaut, a card that is still pretty solid in Limited. It is a bit of a bummer that didn’t give it the “can’t be blocked by walls” thing, since there are a few of them in this set, but either way this is a nice little creature. It is sure to die in combat because it has to block and attack constantly, but it has high enough power that it will kill most stuff at least.

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Leather Armor

AI Rating: 0.2
Pro Rating: 0.5

This probably isn’t worth playing. Its cool that it equips for free, but the bonus it gives is negligible enough to not be worth a card in most scenarios. If you end up with a deck with a crazy amount of Equipment payoffs, which RW might have, MAYBE you end up playing it, but that’s probably the only time you do

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Mimic

AI Rating: 0.5
Pro Rating: 1.0

So, this doesn’t seem amazing to me, though the flavor is quite good. Like most treasures, it can only be used the one time to give you mana, so it isn’t even the best fixing ever. And yeah, it can turn into a creature sometimes, and that’s nice upside to have on your mana, but I’m just not sure this will feel like it is worth an entire card very often. You’ll play it if you really need fixing, or maybe you have some artifact synergies, but that’s probably about it

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Spare Dagger

AI Rating: 0.5
Pro Rating: 1.0

The stats boost it offers is pretty weak, and giving up a whole card to ping something isn’t really something I’m interested in. This IS an equipment, and RW cares about that, so it probably gets played more often than it would in most formats

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Spiked Pit Trap

AI Rating: 1.5
Pro Rating: 1.5

Lots of sets lately seem to have an Artifact that is a removal spell, and it is nice that you can play them in any deck, but they tend to be pretty inefficient, and that’s kind of the case here. You pay 6 mana total for 5 damage, and you might also get a Treasure. It does have Flash, which makes it so you can sort of ambush kill things, but yeah, you probably don’t end up playing this unless you’re short on good removal

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Treasure Chest

AI Rating: 3.9
Pro Rating: 3.0

So, most of the time this will do something nice. Rolling that one will feel brutal, but it won’t happen often. Rolling 2-9 isn’t the best thing ever either, as using up a card for five treasures won’t always matter, but it is some pretty nice fixing and ramp at least. You’re really in business with 10+, though -- when you do that, this will have an insane effect, as drawing 3 life and drawing three cards will be enough to win you the game in many cases. Funnily enough, I don’t think rolling a 20 will be better than 10-19 in most Limited decks, so you will get the best effect here pretty often. This is obviously a super random card, but I think it will do what you want often enough to be worth playing

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Cave of the Frost Dragon

AI Rating: 4.7
Pro Rating: 4.0

For Limited, this might be the best card in the cycle. Having a land turn into an imposing flyer in the late game is incredible. Creature lands just feel like free cards so often, and having lands that actually do something late when you’re flooding out is a great feeling -- and this land can definitely close out a game

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Den of the Bugbear

AI Rating: 4.4
Pro Rating: 3.5

This whole cycle is nice, and this doesn’t disappoint. Creature lands are just great, as having a land that can become an actual card in the later part of the game is great flood insurance, and the creature this can become is definitely a nuisance, especially because it makes Goblin friends to join the fun.

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Dungeon Descent

AI Rating: 1.2
Pro Rating: 1.0

There are a significant number of legends in this set, but I don’t think there’s going to be enough of them to get this off the ground most of the time. Mostly, it will be a tap land that actively hurts your mana base

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Evolving Wilds

AI Rating: 2.7
Pro Rating: 3.0

This is always some really great fixing, as it makes it very easy to splash a secondary color while only running a single basic of that color, and that always feels great for your mana base. They also make any mana base significantly better, even if you are just straight up two colors. You should value these over most “solid” cards

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Hall of Storm Giants

AI Rating: 4.2
Pro Rating: 4.0

This whole cycle looks really good. Creature lands tend to be quite good because they don’t take up a real slot in your deck, yet they can have a very real impact on games. This can just sit around and make mana for you early, and then when you get to the later part of the game you can start sending it after your opponent with all your extra mana. 6 mana is certainly a lot, but the beauty of it is that it gives you a great mana sink, something you usually want, and the creature it makes is no joke either, it can be a real problem on offense or defense for you. And yeah, it will usually come into play tapped, but that’s a fair price to pay. This is something you should take pretty highly, don’t underestimate the power of creature lands!

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Hive of the Eye Tyrant

AI Rating: 4.5
Pro Rating: 3.5

This isn’t quite as impressive as the rest of this cycle, but it is still a creature land, and those are great! A 3/3 with Menace isn’t exactly going to command the board all game long, but just having the ability to make one of your lands into one of those is great utility, and the exile effect might actually matter sometimes

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Lair of the Hydra

AI Rating: 4.5
Pro Rating: 4.0

Like the rest of this cycle, Lair of the Hydra is really good, and worth a high pick. It is more flexible than the others, in that you can turn it into a land almost no matter how much mana you decide to pump into it. This means it can chip in for some early damage if it needs to, and it also means that in the extreme late game it will be absolutely massive, and difficult to take down

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Temple of the Dragon Queen

AI Rating: 2.6
Pro Rating: 2.5

Even without dragons, this offers some pretty nice fixing. It is always a bit awkward with these types of lands that make you choose a color, because sometimes you have to play it earlier and name the color of something you aren’t splashing, just cause you need a different color of mana, but this still looks like the kind of fixing that will help decks splash stuff

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Treasure Vault

AI Rating: 2.4
Pro Rating: 2.5

I think this land is probably worth running in most decks despite only producing colorless mana at first. It really overcomes most of its shortcomings by being able to make treasure. In the end, it probably doesn’t really hurt your mana base, since you can always give it up for Treasure, and in the later part of the game you might be able to make some really silly amount of treasure, which might be nice if you have a mana sink of some kind

Card Pro Rating AI Rating APA Picked ALSA Seen
ss-common|White|Artifact — Equipment
2.0 1.5 9.11 153 7.99 1493
ss-common|White|Creature — Pegasus
3.0 2 7.96 171 6.78 1267
ss-uncommon|White|Creature — Dog
1.0 1.1 9.89 57 6.90 539
ss-mythic|White|Legendary Artifact
0.5 // 3.5 4.5 2.23 13 2.27 27
ss-common|White|Creature — Unicorn
3.0 2 7.89 188 7.02 1319
ss-uncommon|White|Enchantment — Class
1.5 // 3.5 2.9 5.84 61 4.60 350
ss-uncommon|White|Artifact Creature — Gargoyle
3.0 3.2 5.09 80 4.30 335
ss-rare|White|Artifact — Equipment
4.0 4.7 1.58 31 2.60 56
ss-common|White|Creature — Human Cleric
2.5 1.8 8.28 131 6.86 1345
ss-common|White|Artifact — Equipment
2.0 1.8 8.34 130 6.88 1237
ss-common|White|Creature — Orc Knight
3.5 1.7 8.61 191 7.96 1560
ss-uncommon|White|Instant
2.5 1.3 9.46 54 6.71 513
ss-uncommon|White|Creature — Human Monk
2.0 1.3 9.60 48 7.12 580
ss-common|White|Creature — Dwarf Warrior
2.5 2 7.83 167 6.85 1336
ss-rare|White|Creature — Jellyfish
2.0 1.5 9.15 20 5.60 146
ss-common|White|Creature — Dwarf Ranger
2.5 0.9 10.36 149 8.89 1632
ss-mythic|White|Legendary Planeswalker — Bahamut
4.0 5 1.24 86 1.75 103
ss-rare|White|Creature — Spirit Knight
4.0 4.7 1.68 28 2.77 54
ss-common|White|Creature — Human Elf Monk
3.0 1.1 9.87 167 8.25 1527
ss-mythic|White|Legendary Creature — Dragon
5.0 5 1.20 105 1.55 121
ss-uncommon|White|Creature — Human Artificer
3.0 2.9 5.85 68 5.37 392
ss-uncommon|White|Creature — Human Soldier
1.5 1.5 8.95 43 6.54 522
ss-rare|White|Creature — Dog
3.0 4.7 1.74 19 2.62 45
ss-common|White|Enchantment — Aura
4.0 3.4 4.71 236 4.54 844
ss-uncommon|White|Creature — Elf Monk
2.5 2.1 7.76 38 5.78 436
ss-uncommon|White|Creature — Human Elf Cleric
3.0 2.6 6.45 64 5.41 411
ss-rare|White|Legendary Creature — Dragon Knight
4.5 4.9 1.19 27 1.71 34
ss-rare|White|Legendary Creature — Gnome Artificer
2.0 3.3 4.87 23 4.10 122
ss-rare|White|Enchantment — Class
4.5 4.8 1.57 35 1.74 46
ss-common|White|Artifact — Equipment
1.0 0.6 11.09 124 9.13 1765
ss-common|White|Creature — Angel
3.5 3 5.53 174 5.42 970
ss-uncommon|White|Artifact — Equipment
3.0 3.8 3.83 69 3.36 231
ss-uncommon|White|Artifact
2.0 2.8 6.02 59 4.52 374
ss-common|White|Artifact
1.5 0.6 11.14 160 9.27 1790
ss-common|White|Creature — Dwarf Cleric
3.5 3.5 4.40 216 4.42 762
ss-uncommon|White|Instant
2.0 2.4 7.08 59 5.69 435
ss-common|White|Creature — Bird
2.0 1.6 8.72 155 7.58 1409
ss-common|White|Creature — Dwarf Knight
3.0 3.2 5.25 205 5.12 955
ss-rare|White|Enchantment
1.0 // 3.5 4.3 2.61 23 2.93 58
ss-common|White|Creature — Human Warrior
3.5 2.5 6.84 203 6.47 1163
ss-uncommon|White|Creature — Dragon
4.0 3.9 3.51 88 3.58 238
ss-common|White|Instant
3.0 2.6 6.63 210 6.36 1161
ss-common|White|Instant
1.5 0.4 11.67 129 9.57 1803
ss-uncommon|Blue|Creature — Human Elf Shaman
3.5 2.4 7.09 69 5.61 400
ss-common|Blue|Creature — Elemental
3.0 1.5 8.98 160 7.86 1521
ss-common|Blue|Creature — Elf Wizard
2.0 1.3 9.51 144 8.24 1503
ss-common|Blue|Instant
3.0 1.5 9.13 177 8.15 1559
ss-rare|Blue|Legendary Artifact
1.5 2.3 7.14 14 4.57 132
ss-uncommon|Blue|Creature — Dragon
3.5 3.1 5.43 61 4.30 305
ss-common|Blue|Enchantment — Aura
3.5 3 5.69 212 5.56 1028
ss-common|Blue|Creature — Gnome Wizard
2.5 1.1 10.08 166 8.93 1697
ss-common|Blue|Instant
3.0 1.9 8.08 160 7.08 1297
ss-mythic|Blue|Creature — Skeleton Wizard
1.5 // 4.0 4.2 2.86 7 2.25 36
ss-uncommon|Blue|Creature — Cat Beast
4.0 3.3 4.93 69 4.10 305
ss-common|Blue|Creature — Djinn
3.5 3 5.61 205 5.61 947
ss-rare|Blue|Creature — Dragon Turtle
4.0 4.4 2.41 27 2.64 57
ss-uncommon|Blue|Creature — Tiefling Wizard
4.0 3.7 3.98 82 3.90 268
ss-uncommon|Blue|Creature — Gnome Warlock
1.0 // 3.5 3.3 4.98 41 4.39 287
ss-uncommon|Blue|Enchantment — Aura
2.5 3 5.67 52 4.54 348
ss-rare|Blue|Legendary Creature — Horror
4.0 4.8 1.50 26 1.64 42
ss-uncommon|Blue|Creature — Orc Rogue
2.5 3.1 5.27 59 4.51 380
ss-mythic|Blue|Legerndary Creature — Dragon
5.0 5 1.15 114 1.37 126
ss-rare|Blue|Creature — Horror
4.0 4.6 2.00 41 2.18 60
ss-mythic|Blue|Legendary Planeswalker — Mordenkainen
4.5 4.9 1.27 100 1.62 119
ss-common|Blue|Instant
1.0 -0 12.50 129 10.21 2031
ss-common|Blue|Creature — Faerie
2.0 1.9 8.15 131 7.45 1374
ss-uncommon|Blue|Sorcery
3.0 1.7 8.65 63 6.44 555
ss-uncommon|Blue|Enchantment — Aura
3.0 2.8 5.97 73 5.02 353
ss-common|Blue|Creature — Giant Warrior
3.0 1.1 9.90 156 8.71 1670
ss-common|Blue|Creature — Tiefling Shaman
3.0 2 7.89 170 7.48 1347
ss-common|Blue|Artifact Creature — Wall
1.5 0.6 11.21 129 9.00 1798
ss-common|Blue|Instant
1.5 0.3 11.82 131 9.46 1774
ss-common|Blue|Creature — Human Rogue
2.0 1.3 9.62 152 8.60 1591
ss-common|Blue|Artifact — Creature Bird
1.5 0.2 12.12 103 9.41 1692
ss-common|Blue|Creature — Elf Rogue
3.0 2.4 7.01 197 6.69 1197
ss-uncommon|Blue|Sorcery
2.5 1 10.14 63 7.64 642
ss-uncommon|Blue|Instant
2.5 0.7 10.81 67 8.18 699
ss-rare|Blue|Sorcery
2.5 2.8 6.00 9 4.10 100
ss-uncommon|Blue|Artifact — Equipment
3.0 2.5 6.69 61 5.48 426
ss-rare|Blue|Instant
1.0 2.2 7.36 11 4.34 128
ss-uncommon|Blue|Enchantment — Class
3.0 3.7 4.09 53 3.60 277
ss-rare|Blue|Artifact
4.0 3.6 4.31 29 4.29 113
ss-common|Blue|Instant
3.0 1.1 9.95 180 8.84 1738
ss-common|Blue|Instant
2.0 0.8 10.61 114 8.58 1592
ss-common|Blue|Instant
1.0 0.2 12.05 146 10.09 2008
ss-rare|Blue|Creature — Snake Rogue
4.0 4.5 2.21 29 2.57 49
ss-mythic|Black|Legendary Creature — Zombie Wizard
4.0 4.9 1.34 64 2.19 95
ss-rare|Black|Legendary Creature — Devil God
3.0 3.9 3.43 23 3.12 72
ss-common|Black|Creature — Beholder
3.0 1.4 9.25 185 8.13 1566
ss-uncommon|Black|Creature — Dragon
3.5 3.8 3.66 68 3.26 237
ss-mythic|Black|Legendary Artifact
0.0 2.8 6.14 7 4.61 39
ss-uncommon|Black|Sorcery
2.0 2 7.90 52 6.11 479
ss-common|Black|Creature — Skeleton
3.0 1.9 8.08 207 7.40 1395
ss-common|Black|Instant
2.0 1.8 8.47 201 7.50 1416
ss-uncommon|Black|Creature — Tiefling Cleric
4.0 4 3.36 73 3.31 237
ss-uncommon|Black|Sorcery
1.5 1.4 9.27 48 6.44 508
ss-common|Black|Sorcery
0.5 // 2.5 0.1 12.19 134 9.93 1942
ss-uncommon|Red|Creature — Elf Spider
3.0 2.9 5.79 70 4.37 323
ss-uncommon|Black|Creature — Zombie
2.5 2.1 7.68 73 5.60 444
ss-mythic|Black|Legendary Creature — Zombie Dragon
5.0 5 1.20 106 1.84 124
ss-common|Black|Instant
3.0 1.1 9.93 190 8.68 1700
ss-common|Black|Sorcery
2.5 1.4 9.38 151 8.03 1460
ss-common|Black|Instant
1.5 0.9 10.43 133 8.56 1601
ss-rare|Black|Creature — Human Knight
4.0 4.6 1.87 30 2.09 47
ss-rare|Black|Creature — Ooze
4.5 4.8 1.56 25 1.65 40
ss-common|Black|Sorcery
3.5 4.1 2.99 239 3.44 572
ss-uncommon|Black|Creature — Goblin Warlock
2.0 3.4 4.60 55 3.88 276
ss-common|Black|Creature — Human Warlock
1.5 1 10.10 131 8.44 1637
ss-common|Black|Creature — Elf Warlock
3.0 1.8 8.35 212 7.67 1511
ss-common|Black|Creature — Tiefling Rogue
1.0 2.1 7.73 182 6.81 1307
ss-uncommon|Black|Creature — Halfling Rogue
2.5 3.2 5.07 56 3.90 311
ss-mythic|Black|Legendary Planeswalker — Lolth
5.0 5 1.13 108 1.72 117
ss-common|Black|Creature — Manticore
3.0 1.7 8.69 184 7.69 1423
ss-uncommon|Black|Instant
4.0 4.5 2.21 91 2.34 188
ss-common|Black|Enchantment — Aura
3.5 3.4 4.75 252 4.84 902
ss-uncommon|Black|Instant
3.0 3.2 5.19 95 4.44 360
ss-uncommon|Black|Artifact — Equipment
3.0 3.6 4.12 76 3.53 234
ss-common|Black|Creature — Zombie
2.5 1.8 8.29 227 7.57 1500
ss-common|Black|Creature — Zombie
2.5 2.1 7.59 172 6.88 1254
ss-uncommon|Black|Creature — Dwarf Citizen
3.0 4.1 3.08 97 3.23 247
ss-rare|Black|Artifact
4.0 3.8 3.72 25 3.19 54
ss-common|Black|Artifact — Equipment
2.5 1.9 8.19 194 7.79 1431
ss-common|Black|Creature — Vampire
2.5 1.7 8.67 180 7.64 1394
ss-rare|Black|Artifact — Equipment
4.0 4.6 1.87 30 2.33 48
ss-uncommon|Black|Enchantment — Class
2.5 3.3 5.02 55 4.33 310
ss-rare|Black|Creature — Vampire
5.0 4.9 1.27 37 1.60 45
ss-rare|Black|Creature — Zombie Soldier
3.5 4.7 1.60 25 2.08 40
ss-common|Black|Creature — Snake Rogue
2.5 3.1 5.38 196 5.11 941
ss-common|Black|Creature — Zombie Ogre
2.5 1.4 9.22 162 7.72 1460
ss-common|Red|Creature — Orc Warrior
2.5 1.5 9.15 177 7.99 1485
ss-uncommon|Red|Enchantment — Class
1.0 // 3.0 2.6 6.62 58 5.85 427
ss-uncommon|Red|Creature — Goblin
3.0 3.7 3.92 91 3.48 218
ss-common|Red|Artifact — Equipment
2.0 1.1 9.96 161 8.70 1746
ss-common|Red|Creature — Dwarf Shaman
1.0 0.5 11.29 145 9.26 1827
ss-uncommon|Red|Instant
3.5 3.7 4.05 77 3.83 255
ss-uncommon|Red|Creature — Human Shaman
4.0 3.8 3.84 110 3.58 258
ss-uncommon|Red|Instant
1.0 1.1 9.86 72 7.16 605
ss-rare|Red|Legendary Creature — Elf Shaman
3.5 4.7 1.68 28 2.27 47
ss-common|Red|Instant
4.0 3.9 3.56 270 3.68 586
ss-common|Red|Artifact — Equipment
2.5 1.2 9.73 171 8.47 1600
ss-common|Red|Creature — Elemental
2.5 1.4 9.38 165 7.95 1501
ss-common|Red|Instant
5.0 2.8 6.09 260 5.83 1051
ss-mythic|Red|Creature — Skeleton
4.5 4.6 1.89 18 1.76 25
ss-common|Red|Creature — Goblin Warrior
1.5 0.9 10.50 147 9.02 1720
ss-uncommon|Red|Artifact — Equipment
3.5 3.6 4.21 80 3.65 287
ss-common|Red|Creature — Ogre
2.0 2.2 7.34 193 6.36 1230
ss-rare|Red|Creature — Goblin Rogue
3.0 4.1 3.07 30 2.78 71
ss-common|Red|Creature — Goblin Barbarian
2.5 3 5.59 239 5.42 971
ss-uncommon|Red|Creature — Goblin
3.0 3.4 4.74 82 4.25 356
ss-common|Red|Sorcery
3.0 2.4 7.03 229 6.82 1208
ss-mythic|Red|Legendary Creature — Dragon
4.5 5 1.20 119 1.62 138
ss-common|Red|Creature — Dragon Warrior
3.0 1.3 9.48 210 8.57 1651
ss-common|Red|Sorcery
2.5 0.2 11.94 148 9.66 1878
ss-uncommon|Red|Sorcery
3.5 4.2 2.82 87 2.96 188
ss-rare|Red|Sorcery
4.0 4.5 2.14 50 2.03 63
ss-rare|Red|Creature — Kobold
1.0 2.8 6.11 19 5.03 131
ss-rare|Red|Artifact
1.5 1.9 8.18 17 5.54 145
ss-common|Red|Creature — Dwarf Barbarian
2.5 2.3 7.19 231 6.59 1235
ss-common|Red|Sorcery
1.0 // 2.5 1.6 8.93 198 8.25 1548
ss-uncommon|Red|Creature — Dragon
3.0 3.9 3.62 85 3.51 271
ss-uncommon|Red|Creature — Beast
3.5 2.6 6.53 100 6.14 518